Types of water lily

Discussion in 'Garden Pond Talk' started by gluepack, May 23, 2012.

  1. gluepack

    gluepack

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    We bought two water lilies in August last year for our then new small pond (1800 litres), one locally and one from amazon.de. It was relatively late in the season but they both did reasonably well.

    The one through amazon had no name and the local one was named “Nymphaea White” (the packaging said http://www.lookonwaterplants.com but it doesn’t appear to exist). Last year the former had about eleven pads by end of season, losing some and gaining more while the latter had about five.

    [​IMG]

    (viz. above image. Locally bought below, amazon.de above)

    The plants were allowed to winter in place, at the bottom of the pond (about 60 cm) and it was quite a harsh winter.

    In a post last year, not knowing the name of the larger padded lily, and based on the fact that it had many leaves at the base of the plant when we got it, it was suggested that it was spatterdock (Nuphar Lutea). However, this year it has already produced about 13 pads and also a flower, that is the typical Nymphaea Alba…..

    [​IMG]

    ..although not fully open when the photo was taken.

    The other one, which was named as “Nymphaea White”, only has five pads so far which are quite a lot smaller…..

    [​IMG]

    …the three on the right, for comparison, and the lower ones in last year’s photo. Also, no flower yet.

    Assuming that they are both Nymphaea Alba, is the smaller one a different sub-species, is it stunted or does it have a problem or is there that much variation between the pads in different plants? It had a smaller root than the other and is in a slightly smaller pot. They are both at about 60 cm depth.

    Ooi, the “foam” that you can see in this year’s photos, is that a problem? It seems to be associated with hot sun (at the moment it is 6.30 pm and there is no/negligible foam). We have had at least fourteen toads (Green European) in the pond with a lot of spawn and currently there are many tadpoles swimming around. Ammonia tests show nothing and the Ph, although a bit high, is still under 8.8. I’m in Bulgaria and it is 20C (68F) in the shade at 6.30 pm.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    gluepack, May 23, 2012
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  2. gluepack

    adavisus

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    Looks like one crown is a lot smaller than the other, perhaps with considerably more root cropping and may take a very long time to get going
     
    adavisus, May 23, 2012
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  3. gluepack

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    It is possible that you planted the smaller one too deep, too soon. If the plant was a newly-potted one, it needs time to adjust to the deeper water. Placing it on a couple of bricks may help it to get growing. Another possibility is that the plant was taken from the wild by someone looking to make a quick dollar (or whatever currency is in use in Bulgaria). Here in Ontario there are many marshes where the water lilies are so overcrowded that the leaves are no more than 5 or 6 cm. across, and flowers only about 4 cm. Under better growing conditions, however, they will reach their full potential in a few years.
    John
     
    HARO, May 23, 2012
    #3
  4. gluepack

    Shdwdrgn

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    Your large one has the same color flowers as mine. I currently have three flower buds, all coming up about 2 days apart. The first one just started to crack open today, and will probably be in full bloom tomorrow with the warmer weather. I've had this plant for several years, but it really seems to be doing much better now that I've planted it deeper (about 3' deep).

    I also have several of the smaller-leaved lilies. I'm trying to figure out what the deal is with them, because I think they were bought recently in one of those 3-packs from walmart, but I've never seen lilies with such small leaves. So far this year I have only seen leaves from one of the three plants coming up, so I might try to fish out the others and bring them up higher in the water. I have never seen any flowers on these smaller types, so my guess is they are an inferior variety.

    The good news is that I just received shipment today from an online store of a 6-pack of new hardy lilies, and they all arrived with very healthy looking bulbs. Have them in a bucket of my pond water for the night, and will get them in the pond tomorrow.
     
    Shdwdrgn, May 25, 2012
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  5. gluepack

    gluepack

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    Well, five weeks later and, with the "small pad" plant having been moved up a brick, we are up to 55 pads in an approx. ratio of 2:9, small pad to large.

    We've had about twelve flowers, all of which have been from the large pad plant, initially one at a time but currently with three in bloom. However, there appears to be one about to break surface that is from the plant with the smaller pads so it will be interesting to see if that is any different.

    I find it quite amazing how rapidly they, both the pads and flowers, grow and interested in the fact that the flowers are there one day (well, for longer than one day) and then no sign of them the next. Ooi, should we be trawling for the old flowers and removing them?

    We recently added a Mimulus Ringens/Blue Monkey Flower, that is doing very well, with lots of flowers, and we’ve just added a Saggitaria Latifolia/Arrowhead and a Iris Pseudacorus/Yellow Flag that we got from a large DIY chain here. It is interesting that there appears to be more water/pond plants on the market here now. Trying to find chemicals is a different matter. Fortunately, despite an overall green tinge, the pH and ammonia levels seem ok and, as all the plants seem to be thriving, we aren't using any treatments.

    Last year a friend gave us an assortment of plants taken from a river nearby and amongst them are some Sparganium Erectum/Bur-reed, Typha Angustifolia/Bulrush and some sundry other reeds/grasses/rushes (terms that I use interchangeably as, apart from using Wikipedia to differentiate, I don’t really know the difference all that well). They all survived the winter and appear to be doing exceptionally well.

    We also have Myriophyllum Aquaticum/Parrot’s Feathers and Lagarosiphon Major/Goldfish Weed.

    We had some beautiful Pistria Stratister/Water lettuce last year and took them in over winter, as suggested, but they didn’t survive indoors unfortunately and, as they are rather expensive, we aren't bothering with them again.
     
    gluepack, Jul 1, 2012
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  6. gluepack

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Wow you have quite the assortment of plants now and glad they are all doing so well for you..............sorry about the water lettuce. I can't get it to grow here at all so I gave up on that and the water hyacinth also.
     
    j.w, Jul 1, 2012
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  7. gluepack

    Shdwdrgn

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    I've never plucked off the old lily flowers, and have not seen any problems from leaving them. My single large lily has been steadily putting up flowers, generally one at a time, for the past two months. I find it interesting how the plant pulls old flowers back underwater - it's such a strange characteristic for a plant in general.

    I may have to move some of my newer lilies up a shelf... Some are getting leaves to the surface, others are not.
     
    Shdwdrgn, Jul 1, 2012
    #7
  8. gluepack

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    I pick my old flowers and leaves off, the bud stem twists and pulls the flower down. I usually pull them just cause they get mushy, more yuck in the water to scoop out eventually. And the water is nice and cool to be playing in on our hot miserable days. The fish swim right up and nibble on my legs and feet. I can reach down and touch them Get a good look at the head while in the pond.

    Most of my plants have 3-6 flowers at a time, esp the colorado, the flowers seem to last 3-4 days. I have not a lot of timing on them, just enjoy.

    I have a orange one, had the plant for a year, no flowers, now it is blooming a beautiful orange flower. Saw it right before we left, i can see one bud on the plant now via the camera, it seems to be a one flower at a time plant so far.
     
    addy1, Jul 1, 2012
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  9. gluepack

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I actually haven't been pulling my old lily blossoms or pads out either. I don't like going in the chilly water here and my pond is not easy to get into and out of so I just leave them till I net the bottom. Noticed also when some of the pads start to turn soft and brown the fish eat them! Can't be cuz they are starving either cuz they get enough food w/ me feeding them a few times per week and all the critters that fall in.
     
    j.w, Jul 1, 2012
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  10. gluepack

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Humm the fish eat them, well maybe I will leave them for fishy food. I am sure there are a bunch of dead ones on the plants now.
     
    addy1, Jul 2, 2012
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  11. gluepack

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Yep mine were ripping the pieces that were soft and brown and gobbling them up last year. Now I'm sure they can't eat very many so most prolly rot and create muck so depending on the amt of fish one has would depend on how many you want to leave in there for them to munch on.
     
    j.w, Jul 2, 2012
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  12. gluepack

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Well, if when we get back, all the old flowers and leaves are munched will leave them be! From what I can see the lilies are growing like crazy, taking over.
     
    addy1, Jul 2, 2012
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  13. gluepack

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    You must have 75% coverage addy! If you do have to prune them you'll be in there all day!
     
    j.w, Jul 3, 2012
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  14. gluepack

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    They are growing unreal this year since I groomed them. I may have to purge some............................. Lots of coverage, keeping that pond cool
     
    addy1, Jul 3, 2012
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