Best plants to help control algae


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Hello, I was wondering which pond plants are the best to help control algae. I am in Kingston Ontario in Canada. Not sure which zone. I have the pond ready for winter, some plants I bring in and are in south facing windows, the lilies etc are down at the bottom. I have about 18 fish some koi, half are about 4 to 6 inches and the other are young about 2 inches. I do have a UV light on the filter but it doesn't really do to much, it is a new bulb this year. there isn't any place near here to get plants, was wondering how ordering has worked for people. thanks take care and stay safe.
 
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Mmathis

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I’ll let the plant gurus answer this one, but I was wondering how big your pond is since you say you have koi.
 

j.w

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What kind of algae are you talking about? Long flowing stuff or short stuff sticking all over your liner etc.?
 
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We have to channel @poconojoe as I sense this is going to need HIS enthusiasm, but here goes; the kind of algae you're probably referring to, which you don't want, is the free floating, single cell variety which blooms when the water conditions are right. Right as in too much decaying biomatter for whatever biofiltration you have, to handle. The UV light WILL kill this type but it'll also kill other good things in your pond. Here, in the hallowed halls of GPF (help me out here, PJ), we've found great success that is almost maintenance free, by using bog filtration (actually called; upflow wetland filtration, but we're lazy asses and just say 'bog').

This is the idea; all the algae coating your underwater surfaces is good algae; you want this. The fish nibble and the algae helps the water column. The free floating type needs to be out competed by other plants, hence your question. The answer is basically 'any plants', including other forms of algae but we like to make this a process and tie up all loose ends. A bog does this. What you need to keep the water clear of nutrients for the algae is plants in your bog, which sit above a pea gravel base, where you force water under and up. There are no pads to clean, there is no bioballs/shreds (that's what the pea gravel does and a lot better because there's a lot more of it), and no UV necessary.

Such as water lilies are NOT great for outcompeting the free-floating algae, but the blooms are nice! Most marginals sit at the sides and DO help, but you need a lot of them. Floating plants like water hyacinth and water lettuce are great at helping, but you will need to watch for your fish nibbling at roots and if they do, put them in protective floating baskets so they can still do their job.

Easy answer? Any plants IN your pond. Better answer? A bog filter where you have lots of plants AND more surface area for your good bacteria.

Btw, with winter, the fish are going to slow and you won't need anything as the bacteria will die (mostly) and start up again in the spring. THAT'S when you move in floaters and consider bog filtration to fix a lot of problems.

Hope I left something for PJ to comment on...I get so carried away when he's absent...

;)
 

j.w

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Man you write fast @brokensword !I just left you in another thread just a flash ago
1633191582093.gif
 
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We have to channel @poconojoe as I sense this is going to need HIS enthusiasm, but here goes; the kind of algae you're probably referring to, which you don't want, is the free floating, single cell variety which blooms when the water conditions are right. Right as in too much decaying biomatter for whatever biofiltration you have, to handle. The UV light WILL kill this type but it'll also kill other good things in your pond. Here, in the hallowed halls of GPF (help me out here, PJ), we've found great success that is almost maintenance free, by using bog filtration (actually called; upflow wetland filtration, but we're lazy asses and just say 'bog').

This is the idea; all the algae coating your underwater surfaces is good algae; you want this. The fish nibble and the algae helps the water column. The free floating type needs to be out competed by other plants, hence your question. The answer is basically 'any plants', including other forms of algae but we like to make this a process and tie up all loose ends. A bog does this. What you need to keep the water clear of nutrients for the algae is plants in your bog, which sit above a pea gravel base, where you force water under and up. There are no pads to clean, there is no bioballs/shreds (that's what the pea gravel does and a lot better because there's a lot more of it), and no UV necessary.

Such as water lilies are NOT great for outcompeting the free-floating algae, but the blooms are nice! Most marginals sit at the sides and DO help, but you need a lot of them. Floating plants like water hyacinth and water lettuce are great at helping, but you will need to watch for your fish nibbling at roots and if they do, put them in protective floating baskets so they can still do their job.

Easy answer? Any plants IN your pond. Better answer? A bog filter where you have lots of plants AND more surface area for your good bacteria.

Btw, with winter, the fish are going to slow and you won't need anything as the bacteria will die (mostly) and start up again in the spring. THAT'S when you move in floaters and consider bog filtration to fix a lot of problems.

Hope I left something for PJ to comment on...I get so carried away when he's absent...

;)
thanks brokensword I will search and learn more about the idea of bog filter
 
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addy1

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thanks brokensword I will search and learn more about the idea of bog filter
You will never regret it, I filter only with a big bog, never fuss with green water, excess algae, string algae etc. Those plants suck out the excess nutrients leaving nothing for the algae to live on.
 
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any thing that grows fast and is not invasive
 
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