Central Florida pond under construction

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by shinksma, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. shinksma

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,866
    Likes Received:
    13,494
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    Ha Ha that is what I'm going to try to do this year too CE. Control the plants and only keep one of each color. Lol, we will see who wins............I think it might be the plants!
     
    j.w, Mar 15, 2013
    CountryEscape likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  2. shinksma

    callingcolleen1 mad hatter

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    8,943
    Likes Received:
    7,337
    Location:
    Medicine Hat Alberta, Canada (zone 2/3)
    Love your pictures! All I have right now to look at is brown cold ground and ice and snow!!! You are so lucky to live in Florida!
     
    callingcolleen1, Mar 15, 2013
    1. Advertisements

  3. shinksma

    gardengimp

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    195
    Location:
    Central Florida
    I have read that water lily leaves will also stand above the water if they are too crowded and need dividing. I have a water poppy in a small half barrel, and it's leaves stand above the water because it is crowded.

    Not sure if I'm adding to your confusion CE or helping ....
     
    gardengimp, Mar 15, 2013
    CountryEscape likes this.
  4. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    Oh, you're confusing me more, but that's ok. I'm learning as I go. So, do the lotus usually grow above the water, and the lilies usually on the water surface? That's the way I try to keep them separate in my mind. I know the lotus flower is very different than the lily, too, or from what I've seen they are different. The lotus sure has a very different seed pod than the lily.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 15, 2013
  5. shinksma

    gardengimp

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    195
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Lotus leaves are a lot different than lily leaves. Well, at least the lotus and lily's I see out on the St Johns river. Here is a good youtube video that explains the differences.



    PS - and I so want to write this guy and ask where he got his mesh pots :razz:
     
    gardengimp, Mar 15, 2013
    CountryEscape likes this.
  6. shinksma

    callingcolleen1 mad hatter

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    8,943
    Likes Received:
    7,337
    Location:
    Medicine Hat Alberta, Canada (zone 2/3)
    I must get out of the house and travel down to Florida one of these days and see the wild lotus plants down there. Up here where in live in Canada, never heard if anyone growing lotus outside before I think our season is just too short. I know I saw them only once selling at our local greenhouse, but they never got them again, must not have worked out too well.
     
    callingcolleen1, Mar 15, 2013
  7. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    I've never seen them in the greenhouses here either, Colleen. I know they grow wild in the rivers in NW Illinois, though. They are THICK, and everywhere along the Mississippi River. I was going to wade out and get one, and then decided they were just plain white, and I wanted color .... and I didn't want to deal with any snakes that may have been in the area either. The water was about 18" deep, so I would have gotten quite wet, but hey, what we will do for a free wild flower, right?
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 15, 2013
    callingcolleen1 and j.w like this.
  8. shinksma

    gardengimp

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    473
    Likes Received:
    195
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Yup, and we have giant koi in the St. John's also.
     
    gardengimp, Mar 15, 2013
  9. shinksma

    shinksma

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2013
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    Orlando, FL
    Heh, I've found round or square mesh pots up to 10" (diameter or on a side) on Amazon and other on-line retailers. I prefer round, since the rhizomes of the hardy water lilies and lotus will then not get jammed into a corner. I may procure some, to see how they do: as I mentioned in a different thread in a mini-discussion with CountryEscape, I'm not sure if there is any actual benefit, but I'll have a go at a couple to compare to regular pots. Just wish I could find some bigger than 10": my lotus came in a short pot that is about 14" or 16" across.

    shinksma
     
    shinksma, Mar 15, 2013
  10. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    I just finally watched the video. As he said, the roots will go through the mesh, and that's all fine and dandy maybe for the tropicals, which as he said are smaller round bulb tubers, but I still think it's a mess waiting to happen with hardy lilies. Those are much stronger, and they will go through the mesh, and continue growing until they find something else to grab onto. In the solid pots, this never happened. If you use the mesh pots, try to find smaller lilies that don't get as large, that would help, too. I'll be anxious to hear your conclusion by comparing the mesh to solid pots, Shinksma. I hope both work well for you. The pots in the video were small, so maybe they will grow just fine in them. I just see cutting off a ton of roots to separate the tubers. Come to think of it, when I separate the tubers, most of the roots come off anyhow, so maybe that is no problem.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 16, 2013
  11. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    OK, another thing that needs to be pointed out about the lotus and fish - they are both extremely invasive, as the video guy stated. He said that the lotus could take over that lake in a season. I find that a little stretched, but when I saw them growing wild on the river, I realized how quickly they can spread, and how hardy they are, even on fast moving water, although they were over along the bank and it must not have been very deep there. When you see koi in a lake or pond, remember that they are an invasive species and if they spawn and the rains come and wash babies out, some of them may survive down stream/ditch in another body of water. I would love to put koi in my farm pond, but if any "got out" and washed down the ditch to other bodies of water, and they tracked them back to me, I could be in big trouble, forced to pay for the removal of them in other places. So, unless and until I find a way to keep them in my farm pond, they will not get located there. Of course, I could claim that a bird must have carried one there, and released it .... :) And, for now, I don't have any extras I want to get rid of.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 16, 2013
    j.w likes this.
  12. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    OK, while I was outside today, I noticed this one mesh basket that I had purchased about 5 water plants already potted in it, growing like crazy, and I could not resist! Sadly, the one I loved the most, a red stemmed hibiscus, did not live, even though I brought the whole basket into the basement under a light for winter. Anyhow, here is what the pot looked like that fall when I took it out of the bog. OMG, roots went everywhere, I didn't think I was ever going to talk it into coming out! There was no way to easily remove one of the plants to repot it, too much damage to the root system.
    Mesh basket.JPG
    As you can see, the roots were not only on the outside of the basket, but MOSTLY on the outside. The basket was created like I think most greenhouses do them. Overkill, too many plants, but they look wonderful for the season. Just to get the plant roots out now will need a knife or pruners to cut through the tangled mess. I'd like to find another plant to put in it, one that would not grow as quickly, maybe, and not "leave" the basket. Not sure what that would be, though.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 16, 2013
  13. shinksma

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,866
    Likes Received:
    13,494
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    What a mess and I've been there and done that before leaving water lilies in one of the holed baskets. No more of those kind for me. I'm sticking w/ the solid sided ones. Then the only thing they can do is jump out and that's easy to deal with.
     
    j.w, Mar 16, 2013
  14. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    I agree, JW. I had too many lilies in my pond last year. I went into the pond, nice warm water, nice warm day, and had a heck of a time finding the dead stems to remove and prune, there were far too many plants mingled among each other. Going to try to limit them this year, maybe put a tall plant in between each pot of lilies, to break up the sides some. Now, just need some taller plants that are hardy, maybe something that blooms, but not something that goes wild and takes over. Any suggestions, my fellow ponders???
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 16, 2013
  15. shinksma

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,866
    Likes Received:
    13,494
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    Hey I found this today in one of my emails from a company and looks like it would be pretty easy to make. Isn't the foam stuff around the outside just some kind of black insulation foam you might find at Lowes or H-depot?

    Description:
    Create a floating floral showcase while improving water quality. Heavy-duty, black polyethylene foam flotation collar fits snugly around planters, keeping your favorite bog plants, annuals, and houseplants afloat and protected from nibbling koi.

    Floating pots.jpg
     
    j.w, Mar 16, 2013
  16. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    Very cool! Can also use the floating "noodles" they have for kids, cut to size, and glued to a pot. That's water clover in that pot in the pic, what a good way to keep it in check! Koi will probably nibble off any stragglers that think they are going to move out and on! And, love the idea of floating oasis, too. I also like the ideas others have posted of floating islands, with numerous pots in them.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 16, 2013
  17. shinksma

    callingcolleen1 mad hatter

    Joined:
    May 1, 2012
    Messages:
    8,943
    Likes Received:
    7,337
    Location:
    Medicine Hat Alberta, Canada (zone 2/3)
    CE, that lilly bulb should have been stored dry, in dry wood chips, in a very cool place, when not in the pond or growing. The trouble with Lilly's is they tend to rot if in stale stagnant water, sitting on the very cold floor in the basement. Lilly's do not grow too good in these conditions, and the cold floor makes the water too cold to grow the Lilly (but to warm to prevent rot) even with lights, so they rot. When they are not growing, they can rot very quick. They also can rot in warmer stale water too, with poor lighting. Lilly's can rot very easy in these conditions. They get this blue green slime that shines around the bulb and that is the crown rot beginning. I have a very hardy water Lily that has been horribly neglected and let outside in the pond the last 21 years and somehow it is still alive! The ice cold water all winter keeps the bulb fresh when not growing. Tropical Lilly's bulbs that you can sometimes find at Wallmart or other places, are sold quite often very cheap, cause they are in a bag with woodchips and not planted up. This makes them easy to store and transport so the price can be very cheap. l purchased my Lilly years ago as a dry bulb. Dry Lilly bulbs grow very fast when planted up in the spring.
    Years ago when I worked at this greenhouse I used to plant large water garden baskets up in mesh baskets cause that is the best way to plant water plants. The baskets are thick plastic mesh that are very durable in the water and last for many years. The mesh allows the plant roots to grow threw the holes and thus take up more nutrients. The trouble is most people don't know how to use them right. The baskets should be lined with paper and then the soil of your choice placed in. I used to use a brown paper bag to line my baskets and made my own soil out of stinky river clay, peat, and some topsoil. I would mix the soil in a big tub and mix in a little bit of water and mix well till it turned into a heavy thick jiggly mass. This mixture when mixed right, the one part clay from the river muck would make everything stick together real nice and the plant would root thew this in record time. Don't use this soil with koi as they just love the muck and will dig it all out and make big mess in pond! Most people just use plain kitty litter type soil, but that soil never gets solid and the kitty litter can dump out of basket if basket is knocked over in pond. The heavy clay soil I used to make would stick really good to the pot and not fall out like kitty litter.

    Larger stones should be placed over top of the kitty litter as large koi have been known to disturb the roots and dig in kitty litter too.
     
    callingcolleen1, Mar 20, 2013
  18. shinksma

    CountryEscape

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    7,144
    Likes Received:
    4,576
    Location:
    near Effingham, Illinois
    Colleen, are you referring to the tropical lilies I said I have in the basement? I read they are supposed to be kept moist, so I had them loosely in a plastic bag, not wet, just moist. Probably killed them all. The plants I put in soil in the basement are canna's, and if those bulbs die, so be it. I let them totally dry out, placed them on a shelf on brown paper. Same thing with the elephant ear and black taro. Those are the bulbs I planted, and just looked, nothing has sprouted yet. I suspect it's too cool for them to sprout, so will just be patient. No mold growing, pots have moist soil, but are not standing in water. The tropical lily bulbs are still moist, no mold, still very firm, so I think they will be ok. We shall see! Thanks for the pointers.
    On the mesh pots, if you lined the pot with brown paper, would the paper eventually rot away and allow the roots to grow out of the mesh pot then? I know that's supposed to be a good thing, roots growing out of the pot, just as long as you can trim the roots and repot the plant if/when necessary. I've just found them to be very frustrating trying to repot them. What plants could be planted in them that would not need to be repotted every year or two? I'm still trying to think of something to put in that nice mesh pot.
     
    CountryEscape, Mar 20, 2013
  19. shinksma

    sissy sissy

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2011
    Messages:
    30,005
    Likes Received:
    13,285
    Location:
    Axton virginia
    you can buy the mesh baskets at a dollar store also .The plant roots grow through them and break them anyways ,so none of them hold up .I put y plants in a mesh dollar store laundry bag and then put them in a dollar store basket .
     
    sissy, Mar 20, 2013
  20. shinksma

    j.w I Love my Goldies

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2010
    Messages:
    23,866
    Likes Received:
    13,494
    Location:
    Arlington, Washington
    Well there you are sissy! We all thought you went and moved up to Michigan!
     
    j.w, Mar 20, 2013
    sissy likes this.
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.