In-line Hose Filter for removing chloramines - pros and cons?


YShahar

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Shalom Y'all,

Hubby, aka His Honor the Cook, recently saw this filter on Amazon and raised it as a possibility for filling ponds:

First, I'm not entirely sure that we actually need something like this, as I don't think our water is treated with Chloramines (though the treatment can change without warning). But more importantly, would this be safe for fish? Would it be an alternative to water conditioners like Prime for folks that do have chloramine in their city water?

-Yael
 
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Shalom Y'all,

Hubby, aka His Honor the Cook, recently saw this filter on Amazon and raised it as a possibility for filling ponds:

First, I'm not entirely sure that we actually need something like this, as I don't think our water is treated with Chloramines (though the treatment can change without warning). But more importantly, would this be safe for fish? Would it be an alternative to water conditioners like Prime for folks that do have chloramine in their city water?

-Yael
Interesting story behind this filter. I purchased this very one from Amazon and attached it to my auto fill hose. It requires an extender so that you can attach it to your spigot...I purchased this one:


Everything was fine for about four months...Then I heard a hissing one night and went out to see that it did indeed spring a leak....It was spraying for who knows how long (I will know once I get my water bill this month:(....I think that when the filter eventually gets clogged from months of use it probably caused pressure in the extender...Moral of the story is that the filter is great as long as it is not put on an "auto fill system" where your water spigot is always on.....
 

YShahar

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Interesting story behind this filter. I purchased this very one from Amazon and attached it to my auto fill hose. It requires an extender so that you can attach it to your spigot...I purchased this one:


Everything was fine for about four months...Then I heard a hissing one night and went out to see that it did indeed spring a leak....It was spraying for who knows how long (I will know once I get my water bill this month:(....I think that when the filter eventually gets clogged from months of use it probably caused pressure in the extender...Moral of the story is that the filter is great as long as it is not put on an "auto fill system" where your water spigot is always on.....

Yikes! Well, that's a cautionary tale! So I suppose it could work if our water company ever decides to add chloramine to the water, so long as I don't put it on the auto fill line.

Still, the fact that it sprang a leak is not terribly encouraging!
 
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Yikes! Well, that's a cautionary tale! So I suppose it could work if our water company ever decides to add chloramine to the water, so long as I don't put it on the auto fill line.

Still, the fact that it sprang a leak is not terribly encouraging!
No, YShahar, it is my worst fear....I am hoping I caught it early in the game...
 

YShahar

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I hear you! Water has gotten expensive enough here that even a small leak ends up being a financial nightmare (let alone the waste of a precious resource).
 
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I have chloramines. If I choose to remove them I use vitamin C (I use lemon juice from my lemon tree). However I fill my ponds with an irrigation dripline and don't think removal by me is necessary due to the very slow rate of fill. If it was a complete fill I would use the vitamin C.
 
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Interesting story behind this filter. I purchased this very one from Amazon and attached it to my auto fill hose. It requires an extender so that you can attach it to your spigot...I purchased this one:
"auto fill system" where your water spigot is always on.....
P BVNR43
Place the filter after the auto fill so when the water shuts off the filter does too. I also recommend timers be doubled up have them both at thec same start stop times so if one ever fails the water will be shut down by the other
 

YShahar

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I have chloramines. If I choose to remove them I use vitamin C (I use lemon juice from my lemon tree). However I fill my ponds with an irrigation dripline and don't think removal by me is necessary due to the very slow rate of fill. If it was a complete fill I would use the vitamin C.
OK, now you have me curious! I'd love to learn more about how this works, as I never know if (or when) our local water company will start adding chloramines.
 
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OK, now you have me curious! I'd love to learn more about how this works, as I never know if (or when) our local water company will start adding chloramines.
i don't believe there's a specific time as much , I'm pretty sure its a constant. Any water will grow bacteria thus Chlorine or chloramines. A constant level is maintained in our public water supplies phosphates are another additive many municipalities add to our water as it helps keep pipes from rotting out.
fluoride can be added as well not sure why i doubt they do it to make for pearly whites
 
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I am not a chemist. To the best of my knowledge chloramine gets *used up* when it comes in contact with organic matter. We are dealing with extremely dilute concentrations of chloramine when blending in drips of chlorinated water with pond of water. We often hear ponders say it is ok to use tap water to fill a pond if we only refill 5 % or less.



Chloramine is neutralized in the soil by reactions with organic matter, destroying it in the process. Organic matter in the form of humus can hold 15 times its weight in water, hence the soil loses some of its ability to hold and store water.

Chloramine hurts the production of compost tea as it kills off some of the microbial species that one is trying to grow to high densities. Note: One teaspoon of humic acid (liquid form of humate) can neutralize the chloramines in 100 gallons of water depending on the exact concentration of chloramines.

Using high humus products like compost, native mulches (that have been composted) and humate in ones landscape is the easiest way to minimize the damage from chloramines and chlorine. This ensures that even if some of the organic matter is destroyed and some of the beneficial microbes are killed, the soil life can quickly regenerate and prevent problems.
 
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I am not a chemist. To the best of my knowledge chloramine gets *used up* when it comes in contact with organic matter. We are dealing with extremely dilute concentrations of chloramine when blending in drips of chlorinated water with pond of water. We often hear ponders say it is ok to use tap water to fill a pond if we only refill 5 % or less.



Chloramine is neutralized in the soil by reactions with organic matter, destroying it in the process. Organic matter in the form of humus can hold 15 times its weight in water, hence the soil loses some of its ability to hold and store water.

Chloramine hurts the production of compost tea as it kills off some of the microbial species that one is trying to grow to high densities. Note: One teaspoon of humic acid (liquid form of humate) can neutralize the chloramines in 100 gallons of water depending on the exact concentration of chloramines.

Using high humus products like compost, native mulches (that have been composted) and humate in ones landscape is the easiest way to minimize the damage from chloramines and chlorine. This ensures that even if some of the organic matter is destroyed and some of the beneficial microbes are killed, the soil life can quickly regenerate and prevent problems.
give me the good old bottle of dechlorinater
 

YShahar

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give me the good old bottle of dechlorinater
Ah, but if you live in a place where dechlorinator (and pond products in general) are either totally lacking or ridiculously expensive, then @zeuspaul 's solution is very helpful indeed. And one thing I've got a lot of is lemons! In fact, because of the damage to the lime tree from that one olive branch that fell on it, I've got one whole lime branch dipping into the pond at the moment. That's about half the crop that will probably have to be thrown away this year, sadly. When life gives you ruined limes, make dechlorinator!
 
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Guess that one area Americans falter. We expect everything on the shelves at the store.
We expect our leaders to help situations at emerge better, not make them 10 times worse.
 
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YShahar

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Guess that one area Americans falter. We expect everything on the shelves at the store.
We expect our leaders to help situations at emerge better, not make them 10 times worse.

Well, it is nice when everything works out easily and things are readily available. But sometimes not having ready-made solutions leads to interesting innovations. That can be good too!
 

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