Does too much algae....


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restrict the amount of oxygen in the water?

There was a lot of string algae in the pond and some was inhibiting one of the 2 pumps' ability to work. I went into the pond to clean out the pump and found lots of string algae on the intake and in the pond. I removed the excess amounts. The pump is working just fine now and the waterfall is working well. The fish like the increased water movement.


I have not added any chemicals at all since I don't know what's safe.

The pond is about 500 gallons (I think) and there are two pumps running 24/7
. I never remember how many gallons are in the pond.
 
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Well how much water is relatively simple to estimate - there are online pond volume calculators. If you know the width, length and depth you can get pretty close. If you have a rocked pond, you need to deduct for the volume displaced by rocks.

Algae is obviously a problem for your pumps and can inhibit or even stop water from flowing over a waterfall. But as for oxygen in the water, algae is a plant like any other plant so it puts off oxygen during the day and uptakes oxygen at night. Dead or dying algae is another problem.
 
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Thanks. I was very worried. I won't let it get so bad again. I don't mind going into the pond. I just have to wait until the husband goes away since he thinks I am going to knock myself out and drown. :rolleyes:
 

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Well how much water is relatively simple to estimate - there are online pond volume calculators. If you know the width, length and depth you can get pretty close. If you have a rocked pond, you need to deduct for the volume displaced by rocks.

Algae is obviously a problem for your pumps and can inhibit or even stop water from flowing over a waterfall. But as for oxygen in the water, algae is a plant like any other plant so it puts off oxygen during the day and uptakes oxygen at night. Dead or dying algae is another problem.

Algae actually produces more Oxygen during the day than it consumes at night resulting in a surplus of O2. Even though it may not be aesthetically pleasing, algae is one of the most important (and beneficial) group of organisms in any aquatic ecosystem.
 
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I knew some of it is good, but I was not sure about how much is OK. Don't want to choke the koi and catfish. I don't mind that algae is not pretty. My water is not clear, so I can't see any below the water.
 

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Hi Fish Finder. I don't use chemicals in my pond water either and because we breed Koi, I don't have plants in the breeding ponds, except for a few water hyacinths and these are only in the ponds where there are young fry.
What I found in the beginning of my career in the pond hobby (32 years ago) is that the reason why algaes form in ponds is because there is so much nutrient for them to digest, they can't help but stick around. in the pond that the water either turns green or hair algae goes rampant. I used to have so much of it in my ponds that I lost many young Koi.
Then, a friend of mine found this bio-filter on the net, we started using it and before I knew it, my string algae and suspended algae disappeared due to the accumulation of good bacteria in this filter and the fact that I never had to clean my bio-media. If anyone is interested in a diagram of this filter, just let me know.
Also, it used to take me almost all day to clean 14 bio-filters and now with this new filter, it took me only about 2 hours.

Your's Koily, Lorraine
 
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Meyer Jordan

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Hi Fish Finder. I don't use chemicals in my pond water either and because we breed Koi, I don't have plants in the breeding ponds, except for a few water hyacinths and these are only in the ponds where there are young fry.
What I found in the beginning of my career in the pond hobby (32 years ago) is that the reason why algaes form in ponds is because there is so much nutrient for them to digest, they can't help but stick around. in the pond that the water either turns green or hair algae goes rampant. I used to have so much of it in my ponds that I lost many young Koi.
Then, a friend of mine found this bio-filter on the net, we started using it and before I knew it, my string algae and suspended algae disappeared due to the accumulation of good bacteria in this filter and the fact that I never had to clean my bio-media. If anyone is interested in a diagram of this filter, just let me know.
Also, it used to take me almost all day to clean 14 bio-filters and now with this new filter, it took me only about 2 hours.

Your's Koily, Lorraine

Yes, please post a diagram.
 
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Algae actually produces more Oxygen during the day than it consumes at night resulting in a surplus of O2. Even though it may not be aesthetically pleasing, algae is one of the most important (and beneficial) group of organisms in any aquatic ecosystem.
I was going to say the same thing as you did Meyer , why not say more on the subject as I know you've gone into it more than I

Dave
 
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Due having to listen to my wife complaining about huge expense of running my filter 24/7 in my 15,000 gal swimming pool/pond conversion, I'm going more natural this year. I found that adding large amounts of dry bacteria every couple days does quite a good job of controlling the algae and green water. I'm limiting my fish population to 5 koi, 4 adult bluegill, about 20 smaller sunfish, plus a large school of rosie reds and mosquito guppies.
The large size of my pond was a huge disadvantage financially speaking, but with this new approach, I'm making the size work to my advantage by establishing a natural eco-balanced system that should more economical to maintain. It isn't going to be crystal clear all the time and definitely not as colorful, but maintaining a good balance to keep my wife happy is priceless. And I do have to admit she is right about the huge cost of maintaining a koi pond of that size. My wife is now happy about it and I still can enjoy my fish pond.
 
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Due having to listen to my wife complaining about huge expense of running my filter 24/7 in my 15,000 gal swimming pool/pond conversion, I'm going more natural this year. I found that adding large amounts of dry bacteria every couple days does quite a good job of controlling the algae and green water. I'm limiting my fish population to 5 koi, 4 adult bluegill, about 20 smaller sunfish, plus a large school of rosie reds and mosquito guppies.
The large size of my pond was a huge disadvantage financially speaking, but with this new approach, I'm making the size work to my advantage by establishing a natural eco-balanced system that should more economical to maintain. It isn't going to be crystal clear all the time and definitely not as colorful, but maintaining a good balance to keep my wife happy is priceless. And I do have to admit she is right about the huge cost of maintaining a koi pond of that size. My wife is now happy about it and I still can enjoy my fish pond.
You can circulate a lot of water cheap with airlifts, they just can't lift water more than a couple of inches efficiently. Maybe you can figure a good way to circulate and filter your pond without paying a fortune for electricity.
 

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Due having to listen to my wife complaining about huge expense of running my filter 24/7 in my 15,000 gal swimming pool/pond conversion, I'm going more natural this year. I found that adding large amounts of dry bacteria every couple days does quite a good job of controlling the algae and green water. I'm limiting my fish population to 5 koi, 4 adult bluegill, about 20 smaller sunfish, plus a large school of rosie reds and mosquito guppies.
The large size of my pond was a huge disadvantage financially speaking, but with this new approach, I'm making the size work to my advantage by establishing a natural eco-balanced system that should more economical to maintain. It isn't going to be crystal clear all the time and definitely not as colorful, but maintaining a good balance to keep my wife happy is priceless. And I do have to admit she is right about the huge cost of maintaining a koi pond of that size. My wife is now happy about it and I still can enjoy my fish pond.
How often and for what duration are you circulating the water?
 
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How often and for what duration are you circulating the water?
I've been running the pump for a couple hours every couple days when I add bacteria. When the weather gets warmer I may have to run it more. So far everything seems to be working out ok. Yesterday I noticed I have several THOUSAND new baby rosy reds in the pool, which is very cool. It gives the bluegills something to do. They may pick off a few of them, but the reds seem to be able to scatter faster then the bluegills can attack. Very fun to watch.
 

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I've been running the pump for a couple hours every couple days when I add bacteria. When the weather gets warmer I may have to run it more. So far everything seems to be working out ok. Yesterday I noticed I have several THOUSAND new baby rosy reds in the pool, which is very cool. It gives the bluegills something to do. They may pick off a few of them, but the reds seem to be able to scatter faster then the bluegills can attack. Very fun to watch.
I believe you will quickly discover that this is nowhere close to being sufficient water circulation for this pond. You will quickly develop a water quality problem regardless of the amount of bacteria you are tossing into the pond. Bacteria, BTW, that is already present in the water column and on the submerged surfaces.
 
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We'll see what happens over the course of the season. I'm never going to have the crystal clear water like I would if the filter and UV lights were running 24/7, that was a given before I decided to go this route. It's a trade off between clear water and having my wife throw the electric bill in my face every month. Fish can thrive in green water, and mine certainly look healthy and happy.
 
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Very true. I check ammonia and nitrate levels often, so far no detectable amounts of either showing up on my tests. Keeping the fish load very low for the volume of water is the key. We'll see if that holds as he season progresses.
 
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With the large size of Larry's pond and his relatively low fish population I can't see ammonia build up being a big problem.
Even if dumping some unknown powder into a pond could significantly increase the bacteria population somehow, it would not reduce the nitrates (plant and algae nutrients) in the water.
Nitrates are the end produced of the nitrogen cycle and nitrates are basically fertilizer (nutrients) for plants and algae.
nitro_cycle_5.jpg


Larry I suspect if you find that throwing some sort of powder into your pond helps to clear your water the reason is because you are essentially floc treating your water. Flocculation water Treatment
I'd look into Riftlakes's air lift suggestion for increasing circulation and oxygenation without breaking the bank.
You can circulate a lot of water cheap with airlifts, they just can't lift water more than a couple of inches efficiently. Maybe you can figure a good way to circulate and filter your pond without paying a fortune for electricity.
 
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Meyer Jordan

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Bottom aeration would provide the circulation needed, but it too would need to be run 24/7/365. This would also maintain Oxygen levels that may prove to be more of a water quality problem than Ammonia and/or Nitrite. All of these bacteria that are being added require Oxygen, lots of it, to not only function but survive. And this is in addition to the Oxygen demand of the already established biofilm on the entire submerged surface area of the pond.
 
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Thanks for the comments and suggestions. It is only the beginning of the season, so I'll keep you posted on how well this approach works down the road. There will be a good growth of primrose surface plant as the season advances. I only wish Hyacinths weren't banned in my state, because that would do wonders. I also anticipate having to do a couple major water changes as well. But as things stand right now, so far, so good.
 
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