270 gallon stocking ideas. Koi or goldfish, and how many

Discussion in 'Fish & Koi Talk' started by Pondguy3579, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    For my filter pump setup I have a pump with a foam pre-filter (mechanical filter/a little bio) and a small plastic box with bioballs, foam, and other good nesting sites for bacteria.
     
    Pondguy3579, Mar 8, 2018
    #41
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  2. Pondguy3579

    brokensword Not all those who wander are lost

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    the basics of a bio filter are this; water from the pond runs through a media designed to grow bacteria which will help scrub your water of ammonia and nitrites. Nitrates will be a result for which you'll want plants to help.

    Now, you should have (not essential but I recommend as really useful) a mechanical filter PRE bio so your bio doesn't get all clogged up unnecessarily. A basic mech + bio filter can be visualized as a bucket where either bio balls, lava rock, plastic shavings, etc are in the bottom and two layers of some sort of mesh lies on top to catch the larger debris. The water then pours into the mesh padding, through and past the bio ball area, then returns to your pond. That's the basics. How you DIY is many and varied. I've done the bucket idea for a temp turtle enclosure and currently use a drum mech filter which pours into my bog, which then returns to the pond. So, same idea, larger scale and I employ the plants as a main part of my filtration.

    Google 'filter sock' re aquariums and you'll see what I've done, but in grander style. What I like about this method is that I have like 3 times more filtering capacity before I have any cleaning to do (and last year, for my 2700 gal pond, there was NO cleanings until I threw the filter material away in the fall) PLUS the bio portion allows me to enjoy the many plantings I can't grow in the pond itself.

    Realize, the larger your filter (capacity), the less maintenance you're going to have. The more plants you have, the less filtering you need. Your pond itself will eventually become walls and surfaces of good bacteria, but you need to give it time.

    Hope this helps.

    Michael
     
    brokensword, Mar 9, 2018
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  3. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    There's been a very big change. I now have a budget of $400 dollars. Any recommendations on what I should get?
     
    Pondguy3579, Mar 12, 2018
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  4. Pondguy3579

    Lisak1

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    $400 for what? The whole pond?
     
    Lisak1, Mar 12, 2018
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  5. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    Pondguy3579, Mar 12, 2018
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  6. Pondguy3579

    Lisak1

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    What’s the big change?
     
    Lisak1, Mar 12, 2018
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  7. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    The budget
     
    Pondguy3579, Mar 12, 2018
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  8. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    At first it was 100-150
     
    Pondguy3579, Mar 12, 2018
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  9. Pondguy3579

    mrsclem mrsclem

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    I highly recommend you do not consider koi. You are just starting out with your first pond. Stick with goldfish, shubunkins are very nice colored and are much easier to care for. Start slow, build the pond, get your water balance right, learn what you need to look for and then add a couple of fish.
     
    mrsclem, Mar 12, 2018
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  10. Pondguy3579

    Pondguy3579

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    Ok, what about turtles?
     
    Pondguy3579, Mar 12, 2018
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  11. Pondguy3579

    mrsclem mrsclem

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    I have no experience with turtles so can't help with that. We do have several members who keep turtles so hopefully they will post.
     
    mrsclem, Mar 12, 2018
    #51
  12. Pondguy3579

    Jhn

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    What type of turtles do you want to keep? Also, check your state laws there are various regulations especially on native species.

    I keep diamondback terrapins in my pond. I believe brokensword keeps painted turtles in his pond.

    You will need to beef up the filter system on your pond I would follow broken swords suggestion on a filter system for your size pond. Turtles are extremely messy water fouling machines.

    You also need to design your pond so the turtles can’t escape, as they will wander off if they can get out.

    My pond is over 8000 gallons and has 2 diamondback terrapins and a red ear slider I rescued about 2 years ago. The pond is heavily planted, with built in planting beds for lilies, and marginals. Also let a lotus pretty much take over the shallow end of the pond. There's a bog attached to the pond, as well. I pretty much let the plants do all the work in filtering my pond. Never really had any issues keeping turtles in my pond. However terrapins are not large turtles and aren’t plant eaters.

    I used to keep painted turtles and red bellied sliders, they could destroy plants, especially in a small pond. Probably, should have thought out adding the red ear slider ( but it was a rescue)as they do get big and can be hard on plants.

    I would recommend waiting to add turtles until you learn to maintain your water quality and your pond matures per MitchM’s post. Patience and a well thought out pond design are key to success.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
    Jhn, Mar 12, 2018
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  13. Pondguy3579

    Faebinder

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    Without a filter? 4 and you will still have algae issues. Heck 0 fish and you will have a problem eventually.
    With a filter but no bog? Maybe you can get away with 8 eventually but you may have to put some marginal plants and change water occasionally.
    With a bog and a filter? 13 fully grown perhaps.

    Forget koi.
     
    Faebinder, Mar 18, 2018
    #53
  14. Pondguy3579

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    I’m just joining this conversation. I think you need to back up and listen to what everyone is trying to tell you! It’s not about digging a hole in the ground and deciding how many fish you can cram into it.

    There is a “limit” to number, size, and type of fish for a very good reason. Several have already mentioned the “nitrogen cycle.” This is very important for the health and well-being of your fish. You have to have adequate BIOLOGICAL filtration that matches the needs of the fish you have. Goldfish, but especially koi produce a lot of waste that has to be converted by the biofiltration media. Yes, it’s possible to over-stock a pond and get away with it, but it’s usually only going to be your more experienced fish-keepers who have the knowledge and the desire to stay ahead of the bio-load. An over-stocked pond is a set up for disease and sick fish. Smaller ponds are harder to keep “balanced,” and we’re talking about measuring water parameters and taking appropriate action when something gets out of whack.

    As a new person, your priority should be to learn the basics, start slow, progress slowly....learn. It’s exciting to start up a pond! It’s also frustrating, and at times discouraging — especially when your fish start to die “for no apparent reason.” But there is always a reason. For example, when someone recommends a particular ratio of fish, it’s because they understand what’s going to be happening to the water quality over time. You wouldn’t think it would matter, but just the growth of a few fish over a season can have a big impact on the water quality (ammonia, nitrites, etc.).

    And about turtles. Nothing wrong with them. I love turtles (mine are non-aquatic, though). Turtles are very messy! This means that, especially for a smaller pond, they might be detrimental to your water quality. Just something to keep in mind.

    It’s all about good water quality. And water quality doesn’t mean crystal clear water. It means water that’s balanced to reduce waste products that are harmful for the fish — adequate bio and mechanical filtration......monitoring......and adjusting.
     
    Mmathis, Apr 8, 2018
    #54
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