how to start a pond with 2 baby koi?


Joined
May 14, 2015
Messages
138
Reaction score
34
Country
Canada
how big/ deep do you have to go for a small koi pond?
still learning, please be gentle on the comments.
what do I need and how would I start?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Smaug

God makes perfect. I just dug the hole
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
791
Reaction score
413
Location
Gettysburg
Country
United States
A small koi pond starts at about 1500 gallons and would be at least 3 ft deep. My koi pond is 2500 gallons and is only about half the size I woukd like it to be.
 
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
1,137
Reaction score
527
Location
Le Roy, New York
You can keep koi in a small pond just make sure that it is deep enough that it won't freeze. Koi grow very quickly. A two inch koi can grow to over a foot in two years so don't get too many of them.
 

Smaug

God makes perfect. I just dug the hole
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
791
Reaction score
413
Location
Gettysburg
Country
United States
You can keep koi in a small pond just make sure that it is deep enough that it won't freeze. Koi grow very quickly. A two inch koi can grow to over a foot in two years so don't get too many of them.
Clarify your idea of a small pond please.
 

sissy

sissy
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
32,751
Reaction score
15,388
Location
Axton virginia
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
7A
Country
United States
koi oh boy the mistake I made in 2004 .Now at 5000 gallons and over 2 foot long koi ,glad I did not feed them growth food :);)went from preformed until front porch was built to 1500 gallons then to 2500 gallons and then raised sides of liner to about 300 gallons and now 5000 gallons
 
Joined
Jun 5, 2013
Messages
2,189
Reaction score
1,326
Location
NC, US
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
make sure your pond is deep enough for the pond to not be frozen solid during winter so the koi can stay at the bottom and not freeze. You can use pond heater to open a whole in the ice when the pond freeze over. Check your local freeze line (i dont know what it called)

The recommend is 1000 gallon for the first koi. It's actually depend on your filter though. If you have a really good and effective filter, your pond will be able to handle a bit more fish, but over crowding fish is never good.

I'd start with learning what type of pond you want, what type of filter you want.

There are many type of filter out there. I have a 'bog' filter - which is basically a place for me to plant plants. plants will then help with filter the water then the water go back to the pond. Bog filter consist of gravel and plants. you will have to plumb the pipe to the bottom of the bog (a hole in the ground or above ground container) then let the water flow upward through the gravel and back to the pond. The first year my bog filter didnt do so well but this year it's doing great and helped so much with the water quality already. and i got plenty of space to plant pretty plants! I spend a lot of time with my bog/plants, but some people can just let them grow and thin some out once or twice a year.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,693
Reaction score
4,416
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6 A
Country
United States
You're wise to give this some thought before jumping in. There is a lot of information about koi available, so read up. They are more effort than goldfish, growing large, producing more waste and needing more oxygen.....they are often incompatible with plants.

That said, I love koi....they are big and gentle.....I like their personalities. Shubunkin are very pretty and easier to keep.
 
Joined
May 22, 2016
Messages
141
Reaction score
87
Location
Flowery Branch ga
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Mine is 1200 gal 3 ft at deepest running up to seven inches on the bog side if it. I've already got plans to go deeper. The two babies I put in a few months ago are over 6 " long, but really if your in a warm zone youl'll do fine with 3ft. The pond place I go to has a 2.5ft long koi amongst other big ones and its 3 feet deepest but we don't get frigid winters here
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
13
Reaction score
12
Location
West Tennessee
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
My advice would be is to make it deep enough for them to be able to go to bottom to get away from outside predators. Not sure how deep a heron can go but those would be the biggest problem. You could also build a cave for the to be able to hide in if they need to.
 
Ad

Advertisements

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
Moderator
Donor
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
41,209
Reaction score
25,190
Location
Frederick, Maryland
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
This is a neat heron write up. It took us three years to finally stop the heron from enjoying the sushi bar.

THE GREAT BLUE HERON AND YOUR POND
By: Mike Gannon | Posted On: March 27th, 2011 | 26 Comments on THE GREAT BLUE HERON AND YOUR POND | In: Uncategorized

great-blue-heron22-300x230.jpg

LOOK! Up in the sky! It’s a bird, it’s a pla… no, actually it is a bird! About the size of a plane!
The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is North America’s largest heron coming in at about 4 ½ feet tall, 8 lbs., and with a wing span close to 7’ across!
This is no hummingbird.
This commonly found heron has made its home from Mexico to Canada, and even shows up in the Caribbean here and there. The Great Blue Heron likes to roost and hunt along the coastline, estuaries, lakes, and ponds of most of the North American continent making this bird a pretty successful resident of all parts; living in tree top colonies raising 2-5 babies annually. The Great Blue Heron has also managed to find its way right into the backyards of some North American koi pond and water garden owners too.
For most pond owners their first experience with the heron is indirect, when their pond fish start to disappear in part or in whole. A call is made to their pond guy and that is when they first start to hear about the Great Blue Heron. At that point is when customer pond vigilance against the heron usually begins. And it should, because if the heron knows that a quick meal can be had at your pond (aka the Great Blue Sushi Bar) they will come back, and that is when a pond owner will first see this long-legged bird hanging around their pond. Typically the heron will wade into the pond, or stay pond side in a crouching position, and wait patiently for a curious fish to come investigate. These huge herons can crouch into a surprisingly small size. The heron knows that in time a curious fish will approach, and BAM! the GBH spears the fish with its long sharp bill, flips it into its mouth, and swallows the fish whole; this whole process happens lighting quick and is very quiet with hardly a splash to the water. If the fish are small enough the heron will continue this until there is nothing left in the pond, or it cannot physically fit anything more into its body; whichever comes first.
But the Great Blue Heron is not at the pond just to eat fish, oh no, this bird will also take down frogs, large insects, shrimp, crabs, small birds, chipmunks, squirrels, mice, snakes, turtles, baby rabbits and just about anything else that it can eat. It is an equal opportunity hunter and a pond can provide many variety of delicacy. It always seems that the pond owner encounters the Great Blue at mid-feast. Although, these birds might have the appearance of being slow and awkward, they will disappear in a flash. The GBH is incredibly swift on the getaway flight; it gains height and distance quickly, and can reach up to 30 mph when cruising. The GBH also will often cruise at heights just above tree line at 80-90 ft up looking for reflections of water from below. Once that body of water reveals itself to the heron, like a mirror in the sun from below, it will go to investigate it, little colorful fish in the pond; all the better.
The heron is pretty sophisticated in its approach and does not just drop out of the sky haphazard into your backyard pond. Hunting activity is typically done alone on smaller bodies of water, but they will share larger bodies of water. The heron spots a reflection from a pond and will then circle in slowly to find a tree or roof top where it can then use its incredible eyesight to scout out your pond and see what type of meal(s) may be available, and if there are any threats in the area. The Great Blue Heron is very patient and can take quite some time before starting the approach to your pond. Once the area is deemed non-threatening and meal worthy, the heron will fly down to an open area by the pond. It will not plunge into your pond like the return of Apollo 11, nor drop into the body of water like ducks or geese do, the GBH prefers a landing strip and a slow careful “wade-in” approach; stealth is the way of the Great Blue. Once the heron is pond side it has the ability to blend in very well. I’ve actually looked straight at a heron that was IN my pond and did not see it because it was so motionless and its coloring of slate grey mixed with white and black, is such that it just was not very visible even right in front of my eyes. But before I could get to my door to chase it away, it was already high in a tree and gave off a heron call; not a pretty sound either but a kind of harsh croak. The GBH will often fly off just to circle back within minutes and if the threat (you) are gone they are right back to their fine dining.
The GBH really is a majestic bird apart from its desire to eat our pond fish. It is very intelligent and capable of figuring out deterrents that are meant to scare it away. With a life span up to 15 years they can get lots of experience with our sometimes useless methods of trying to keep them away. They seem to have “routes” and will visit the same ponds again and again with each visit being a learning experience about that pond. Typically Great Blue Heron hunt early morning or early evening, but will come at anytime of day. The best means to keep the bird away is to use multiple methods of deterrent. Do not rely on any one form of deterrent because a heron will eventually figure them out to be harmless. I have watched herons figure out ponds protected by fishing lines, I’ve seen a customer’s home video of a heron attacking a heron decoy. Herons do not mind getting the blast of water from motion detector deterrents once they know it does not hurt (they ARE water birds), and scant few of us pond keepers can really put in the time to sit next to our pond waiting in ambush (and if you do have that kind of time, would you want to admit it?) So use multiple deterrents and be creative, but the most important thing is to simply not let the heron have any sense of welcome or peace at your pond site. Chase it; yell at it, throw things, let out the hounds, do what you have to do to keep the bird away. This way you can get to learn how to enjoy this truly amazing, adaptable animal back in Mother Nature’s waters, not yours!
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2015
Messages
339
Reaction score
295
Location
UK
Hardiness Zone
9a ish!
Country
United Kingdom
They're nothing short of a modern day pterodactyl, I positively hate them. Our native species is the Grey Heron. My pond is netted permanently which I don't like to see, but I value each of my fish and are responsible for them in every way, and I don't want to let them be on the herons dinner menu. There is a wild heron colony at a bird zoo two miles away so these pesky birds can be a real problem. I forgot to replace my net for 24 hours recently, the neighbour said they saw the heron by the pond while I was at work. I was horrified as none of my 29 fish could be seen anywhere. It took almost a month for them to gradually come out of hiding and trust me to walk around the perimiter before dashing for safety. So far, I have accounted for all but two fish....and the net is back on again. I won't be making that mistake again, lesson learnt.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 11, 2010
Messages
3,901
Reaction score
3,677
Location
Chicago Area
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
I have a goldfish pond of about 700 gallons or so. I would never consider Koi for that size pond. I would recommend not to have Koi under 1000 sq ft.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2010
Messages
3,901
Reaction score
3,677
Location
Chicago Area
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Oh, I meant 1000 gallons..... I wonder how big a 1000 SF pond would be? Incidentally the whole point of everyone saying you need a big pond for Koi is that you will need to spend an inordinate about of time and money on filtration when the pond is too small. 99% of the problems people have on this forum are related to too much bio-load causing a variety of issue. I'm basically lazy and the small amount of time I get to spend every day by my pond I want to be relaxing, watching my fish, and feed them a little while enjoying a morning coffee or in the evening enjoying my craft beer. I don't want to spend that time working and cleaning my pond or adding chemicals for sick fish. I'd rather have goldfish and not have all those worries. Also I can travel and not worry about my pond or fish while I'm gone.
 
Joined
Jun 7, 2016
Messages
328
Reaction score
134
Location
Kildare
Country
Ireland
Google 'shubunkin goldfish'
Lovely fish with good personalities and grow to a nice size.
 

Attachments

  • goldfish-shubunkin-floccinaucinihilipilification.jpg
    goldfish-shubunkin-floccinaucinihilipilification.jpg
    48.9 KB · Views: 252
  • b3.jpg
    b3.jpg
    23.7 KB · Views: 249
  • shubunkin_goldfish-2.png
    shubunkin_goldfish-2.png
    38.9 KB · Views: 238
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
May 14, 2015
Messages
138
Reaction score
34
Country
Canada
This is a neat heron write up. It took us three years to finally stop the heron from enjoying the sushi bar.

THE GREAT BLUE HERON AND YOUR POND
By: Mike Gannon | Posted On: March 27th, 2011 | 26 Comments on THE GREAT BLUE HERON AND YOUR POND | In: Uncategorized

great-blue-heron22-300x230.jpg

LOOK! Up in the sky! It’s a bird, it’s a pla… no, actually it is a bird! About the size of a plane!
The Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) is North America’s largest heron coming in at about 4 ½ feet tall, 8 lbs., and with a wing span close to 7’ across!
This is no hummingbird.
This commonly found heron has made its home from Mexico to Canada, and even shows up in the Caribbean here and there. The Great Blue Heron likes to roost and hunt along the coastline, estuaries, lakes, and ponds of most of the North American continent making this bird a pretty successful resident of all parts; living in tree top colonies raising 2-5 babies annually. The Great Blue Heron has also managed to find its way right into the backyards of some North American koi pond and water garden owners too.
For most pond owners their first experience with the heron is indirect, when their pond fish start to disappear in part or in whole. A call is made to their pond guy and that is when they first start to hear about the Great Blue Heron. At that point is when customer pond vigilance against the heron usually begins. And it should, because if the heron knows that a quick meal can be had at your pond (aka the Great Blue Sushi Bar) they will come back, and that is when a pond owner will first see this long-legged bird hanging around their pond. Typically the heron will wade into the pond, or stay pond side in a crouching position, and wait patiently for a curious fish to come investigate. These huge herons can crouch into a surprisingly small size. The heron knows that in time a curious fish will approach, and BAM! the GBH spears the fish with its long sharp bill, flips it into its mouth, and swallows the fish whole; this whole process happens lighting quick and is very quiet with hardly a splash to the water. If the fish are small enough the heron will continue this until there is nothing left in the pond, or it cannot physically fit anything more into its body; whichever comes first.
But the Great Blue Heron is not at the pond just to eat fish, oh no, this bird will also take down frogs, large insects, shrimp, crabs, small birds, chipmunks, squirrels, mice, snakes, turtles, baby rabbits and just about anything else that it can eat. It is an equal opportunity hunter and a pond can provide many variety of delicacy. It always seems that the pond owner encounters the Great Blue at mid-feast. Although, these birds might have the appearance of being slow and awkward, they will disappear in a flash. The GBH is incredibly swift on the getaway flight; it gains height and distance quickly, and can reach up to 30 mph when cruising. The GBH also will often cruise at heights just above tree line at 80-90 ft up looking for reflections of water from below. Once that body of water reveals itself to the heron, like a mirror in the sun from below, it will go to investigate it, little colorful fish in the pond; all the better.
The heron is pretty sophisticated in its approach and does not just drop out of the sky haphazard into your backyard pond. Hunting activity is typically done alone on smaller bodies of water, but they will share larger bodies of water. The heron spots a reflection from a pond and will then circle in slowly to find a tree or roof top where it can then use its incredible eyesight to scout out your pond and see what type of meal(s) may be available, and if there are any threats in the area. The Great Blue Heron is very patient and can take quite some time before starting the approach to your pond. Once the area is deemed non-threatening and meal worthy, the heron will fly down to an open area by the pond. It will not plunge into your pond like the return of Apollo 11, nor drop into the body of water like ducks or geese do, the GBH prefers a landing strip and a slow careful “wade-in” approach; stealth is the way of the Great Blue. Once the heron is pond side it has the ability to blend in very well. I’ve actually looked straight at a heron that was IN my pond and did not see it because it was so motionless and its coloring of slate grey mixed with white and black, is such that it just was not very visible even right in front of my eyes. But before I could get to my door to chase it away, it was already high in a tree and gave off a heron call; not a pretty sound either but a kind of harsh croak. The GBH will often fly off just to circle back within minutes and if the threat (you) are gone they are right back to their fine dining.
The GBH really is a majestic bird apart from its desire to eat our pond fish. It is very intelligent and capable of figuring out deterrents that are meant to scare it away. With a life span up to 15 years they can get lots of experience with our sometimes useless methods of trying to keep them away. They seem to have “routes” and will visit the same ponds again and again with each visit being a learning experience about that pond. Typically Great Blue Heron hunt early morning or early evening, but will come at anytime of day. The best means to keep the bird away is to use multiple methods of deterrent. Do not rely on any one form of deterrent because a heron will eventually figure them out to be harmless. I have watched herons figure out ponds protected by fishing lines, I’ve seen a customer’s home video of a heron attacking a heron decoy. Herons do not mind getting the blast of water from motion detector deterrents once they know it does not hurt (they ARE water birds), and scant few of us pond keepers can really put in the time to sit next to our pond waiting in ambush (and if you do have that kind of time, would you want to admit it?) So use multiple deterrents and be creative, but the most important thing is to simply not let the heron have any sense of welcome or peace at your pond site. Chase it; yell at it, throw things, let out the hounds, do what you have to do to keep the bird away. This way you can get to learn how to enjoy this truly amazing, adaptable animal back in Mother Nature’s waters, not yours!
Would dogs keep them away and would they come into the city?
 

sissy

sissy
Joined
Jan 17, 2011
Messages
32,751
Reaction score
15,388
Location
Axton virginia
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
7A
Country
United States
I would go with fat fantails .They are slow growers and don't multiply .The wiggle there butts to get around .I have had mine since 2004 and never got a baby from there .
 
Ad

Advertisements

Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top