Koi Pond


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I new to ponds but I have experience with aquariums and just had a quick question. If I were to start up the pond filter before I add my water conditioner, would i still be suitable for fish and aquatic pond plants? Thanks
 
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addy1

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Starting the filter is never a bad thing. What kind of water conditioner? for chlorine in the city water?
 
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More information would be helpful, but in general if you are concerned about chlorine, letting the water sit for 24 hours takes care of that. Chloramines are a different issue.

But the "why" would be informative - why are you adding water conditioner and why do you want to start your filter without adding it?
 
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Starting the filter is never a bad thing. What kind of water conditioner? for chlorine in the city water?
The water conditioner added says to treat the water and keep the fish safe, alongside with removing chlorine. I bought a different conditioner than I use on my aquariums because I didn’t want to waste mine.
 
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The water conditioner added says to treat the water and keep the fish safe, alongside with removing chlorine. I bought a different conditioner than I use on my aquariums because I didn’t want to waste mine.

Look at the ammonia cycle.

http://www.projectfeed1010.com/blog/2016/10/12/nitrite-an-important-ion/

Overtime, the ammonia rises... the fish die. Then overtime the nitrites rise and the fish die... finally nitrates rule the pond and the fish can survive. The only way to make your fish survive a pond which has a filter that is not ready is to do water changes.

Day 35 is the safest time for fish.

Or you can introduce 1 fish per week depending on the size of the pond.
 
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Welcome Kyle!
Water testing is the best way to ensure when your pond is ready for fish.
Having plants in before your fish is always a good idea.
Fishless cycling using ammonia is the safest method for starting the nitrogen cycle.
 
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Fishless cycling using ammonia is the safest method for starting the nitrogen cycle.
would that be the same ammonia sold at the grocery store, and how much/often per gl of water?
I'll be starting my new pond soon (one can hope) and I'm trying to consider different ways to start the cycle
 

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I prefer the natural way .I even give people water and some of my filter material .I did find out something from 1 of the new ponders here .She thinks the ammonia she used caused damage to her new laguna pump,She just joined the garden center here's talk about your pond that I help with .She is not sure but wish's she had bought a HF pump to do this .The pond store told her to do it and how much to add which makes me wonder about the proper dosage .I never used it so don't know much about it and can't stand the smell of it .
 
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would that be the same ammonia sold at the grocery store, and how much/often per gl of water?
I'll be starting my new pond soon (one can hope) and I'm trying to consider different ways to start the cycle

Yes, ammonia from the grocery store. Just make sure that contains no additives for making suds or scents. "Sudsy" ammonia or "lemon scented" are not suitable.

Fish excrete ammonia, so you are basically taking the place of the fish until a suitable nitrifying bacteria population is established. Once you have zero readings for ammonia and nitrite, and start to see nitrate readings, your pond will be ready for actual fish.
Here is a calculator that tells you how much ammonia, depending on what strength you buy, to add to your pond.
http://www.fishforums.net/aquarium-calculator.htm

(Ignore the "live rock" component of the calculator.)

Don't add any "beneficial bacteria" from a bottle, there is plenty of bacteria available naturally.
You only have to add the ammonia once as long as you add the fish shortly after the bacteria population has been established. If it will be a while before you will be adding fish, just add more of the same amount of ammonia, it should be consumed again within 24 hours.
 
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@MitchM I gave up bottled bacteria, along with other chemicals last year :)
I was going to either start the cycle with ammonia like you said, or what about rinsing the skimmer pads from the existing pond into the new one, would that work?

when we had our pond enlarged couple of years ago, all the fish were put back in while it was filling, I constantly tested the water, but never got ANY readings, and even now when I restart the pond after Spring cleaning, I do not get ammonia nor nitrite reading ever, I even bought a new test kid this year, just to make sure, any thoughts on why this might be?

@Kyle sorry for hijacking your thread:D
 
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I had replied to Kyle's thread because I wasn't sure where his pond was in the cycling phase...

Using your old filter material will work, as long as you have a suitable amount of mature filter material for the number of fish it will be supporting.
Nitrifying bacteria colonize submerged surfaces, only after nutrients (ammonia and later, phosphate) are "sticking" to the submerged surfaces.
Then layer after layer of nitrifying bacteria build up, algae starts to grow and eventually you have a healthy layer of periphyton that is capable of handling your fish's waste.

It boils down to: how big is the surface area of the mature filter material you have, how many/how large are your fish? Then we get back to that "math" thing, from the other thread.;)
Just rinsing the remains of old filter material into the new water won't do it.

As to what happened with your previous setup, I would want to more about it, like size of filtration, fish, pond, etc.

.
 
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Thank you! @MitchM I will revisit this thread when the pond is done, and have hubby do all the math since he loves it!:D then we'll figure out what the best thing for us to do is.
 

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