Nitrite levels high after pond clean


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I think it depends on what type of hypothetical overflow system you have in your hypothetical pond. :ROFLMAO:

Seriously, though - If your pond overflow is the type that depends on a low edge & the excess water floods out at the same rate the rain is falling in/filling it up then I'd assume that the majority of the overflow would be the rain water which would be on the top until more thoroughly mixed in via normal pump circulation.

However, if your set up is like mine (overflow pipe in the skimmer) I'd think that it's a more mixed water, old + new, leaving the pond. My pumps are pulling water in & sending it to the waterfalls (which do the mixing) at a much greater rate than what's being diverted out of the system, so I would assume that the end result is a greater volume of the new rain water staying within the system. The exact percentages? I think that would be completely impossible to determine. (I also think I'm thinking about this WAY too much! lol)
 
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brokensword

...and not every pond in Michigan has a loon!
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I think you already did!

Once it's full, I'd assume the majority of the overflow is rainwater. If I have an open rain barrel that's mostly full and the rain keeps falling I wouldn't assume it's a mix of old water and new rainwater that's overflowing. You can't add more water to an already full pond.
ah, no; the rain WILL mix with the pond water as it falls (there is no barrier between old and new, and this happens on a molecular level; think osmosis where concentrations/temps migrate to balance out; same will happen with new water added to old.) and you'll get a new pH (among other params) based on whatever is in the rain.

So if acidic, and pond is alkaline (pH >7), the pond is getting more acidic. As the rain adds to the volume and mixes, the total carbonates, hardness, etc is lessening due to the acid being added. If KH is high enough, a pH crash won't happen. If low, then yes, could be a problem. I think as Meyer noted; takes a lot of heavy rain to affect a pond that much unless you have a very shallow or low gallonage pond. As typical, a larger pond is easier to keep in balance once there and has more latitude for issues and time to fix. Do note, each .1 lowering of pH is a 1/10th decrease. The fish can adapt if it's a slow process, in either direction.
 
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So, Broniem, how are your fishies doing? Goldfish are pretty hardy, so I'd think they're ok.
 

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