Pots or not

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants' started by Dosry5, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. Dosry5

    Dosry5

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    My 2 week old pond is pretty greenish brown, I know/hope that will change. Plants and more plants help, right? Well I coulda swore I read some different opinions on here whether potted plants help or if the roots have to be exposed. I have about 8 plants right now and only the hyacinth and iris plants aren’t potted.

    Is there a consensus? Will potted plants help clean the water or do I need to get them outta pots and rooted in gravel on a shelf?
     
    Dosry5, Jul 6, 2018
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  2. Dosry5

    bagsmom

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    There are a few things to consider. Even the potted plants will help, and remember that a two week old pond is a brand new baby! (Congratulations!) Many of my plants potted inside fabric planters have roots growing through the planter and into the water. So eventually, I think your potted plants will start to do their thing. That said, there is likely an advantage to having them planted in a little gravel, directly in the pond. And maybe they will be more effective sooner that way. The problem with having them right in the pond comes when you have really aggressive growers. I have some wild and crazy plants that have jumped the pots or self-seeded. Luckily, they are pretty easy to pull out. When I do pull them, it disturbs the gravel and detritus that has collected in it. Pulling the plants does muck up the water for a bit, but the fish seem to love the cruddy water and the novelty of me being in the pond! I have heard others say that some varieties of iris will really do a number on the pond, and might even harm the liner. I know lotus will take over a pond as well.
    So, I'm thinking - see what everyone else has to say. I'm thinking it is fine and may even be preferable to plant some plants right in the pond in gravel. But some other plants are probably better in containers!
    You need to show us some pictures!!!! We love pond pix!
     
    bagsmom, Jul 6, 2018
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  3. Dosry5

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    I cleared up my little hot tub pond by putting plants in. They are all in pots. It did take a bit of time. Can't say how long, we were busy rehabbing a house. One day I looked at the pond and it was clear!
     
    addy1, Jul 6, 2018
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  4. Dosry5

    Dosry5

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    I probably tend to think pots are ok. BUT, I’d like to put more gravel on my shelves and just root them that way. Haven’t done that because the thought of mucking up the water more when I’m impatiently waiting on it to clear is sickening! My wife wouldn’t believe me that she could lose all the dirt from one of the iris plants and just put in gravel—so she put the dirt clod in gravel. Now every time you even breathe near that plant I get cloudy dirty water. I’ve had to forbid her from repositioning the plant for the 50th time because of how dirty it gets the water!
     
    Dosry5, Jul 6, 2018
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  5. Dosry5

    Lisak1

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    I'm a big fan of naturalizing plants in the pond as much as possible. So much less work and I love the look. My potted plants were constantly tilting and tipping with every breeze. Now I just have to manage them like any other garden plant - keep them groomed and under control.

    My lilies are in pots though - don't trust them free range!
     
    Lisak1, Jul 6, 2018
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  6. Dosry5

    Timothy Proprietor "Frog's Neck Inn"

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    We have lily's, and cattails in pots with kitty litter (non-clumping, non scented, just plain clay,) and a sprinkle of Osmocote that seem to be doing well. We also have water hyacinth free floating that provides shelter for fry and the goldfish like to nibble on the roots, but don't destroy the plant like koi would.
     
    Timothy, Jul 6, 2018
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  7. Dosry5

    Dosry5

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    How do you keep your hyacinth from floating into your skimmer? I tried the tie it to a rock method but the line came off and I didn’t think tying it too tight was a sound idea....
     
    Dosry5, Jul 7, 2018
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  8. Dosry5

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    When I had hyacinth, I tied a floating rope around it, anchored the rope to the side of the pond. They like being in a tight group.
     
    addy1, Jul 7, 2018
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  9. Dosry5

    Lisak1

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    This - or some people use a hoop that floats or fishing line. Anything to corral them. I have a few spots in my pond where I can stick them and they don't float away... or get chewed on by hungry fish!
     
    Lisak1, Jul 7, 2018
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  10. Dosry5

    Timothy Proprietor "Frog's Neck Inn"

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    We just trap the hyacinths within the lily pads. If they do "escape" our skimmer is under a "bridge" and they get stuck before they reach the skimmer.

    Trapped in lily's
    DSC04852.JPG

    "Caution, Low Bridge"
    DSC04853.JPG
     
    Timothy, Jul 7, 2018
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  11. Dosry5

    Dosry5

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    That’s really neat.....but how do you access your skimmer?
     
    Dosry5, Jul 7, 2018
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  12. Dosry5

    Timothy Proprietor "Frog's Neck Inn"

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    Thank you!
    The "bridge" is slightly diagonal and hides the main filter, GFI circuit boxes, aerator pump, and skimmer. The deck opens up like a draw bridge on hinges and allows access to everything. It's not very neat under there, but is functional and easy to get to.

    "Bridge over tranquil waters." DSC02489.JPG

    Pond side. DSC02490.JPG

    Opened up for access DSC02491.JPG

    The skimmer has pea gravel in the side pockets to keep it right-side-up, and blue box store foam insulation to keep it on the surface. A dedicated pump is attached via a hose which takes suction through the skimmer and discharges thirty feet away in the far corner creating a very stately somewhat circular current in the pond.
     
    Timothy, Jul 7, 2018
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  13. Dosry5

    Bluerooster

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    I have a piece of hay string floating in the water, and attached across the pond. All the floaters are behind that.
     
    Bluerooster, Jul 13, 2018
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  14. Dosry5

    Dosry5

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    What kind of wood did you use? Are the posts different than the planks? Just curious about both longevity and what certain woods would do to the water quality. Seems like an intriguing idea and I’m looking for a way to cover my skimmer box.
     
    Dosry5, Jul 15, 2018
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  15. Dosry5

    Timothy Proprietor "Frog's Neck Inn"

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    The main stringers for the bridge are salvaged railroad ties. The cross planks are recycled PT 2X6's four feet long. These planks are so old all of the pressure treatment has leached out causing no concern for the water.The posts are actually untreated two hole cedar fence posts installed upside down with a steel band lagged to the deck support stringer to hold them in place. I wrapped scraps of pond liner around the submerged end to prevent any chaffing against the liner.
    I bought an inexpensive plastic trash can, drilled some holes in the bottom, dug a hole sufficient to bury it, then installed the mechanical filter in it. The aerator pump is the tan colored item.
    The skimmer is a large Tetra unit. It is ballasted with pea gravel so it won't topple over and has a couple pieces of blue rigid foam insulation pieces fastened to the ballast pockets to keep it floating upright. A submerged pump hose is attached at the bottom for suction and the discharge runs through a section of corrugated 1 1/4" hose the length of the pond exiting 30' away which creates a slow circular current.

    All of the components are under the "bridge"
    IMG_0093.JPG


    The return from the skimmer is in the corner to the right lower corner of the photo just to the right of the bog sluice return.
    IMG_0092.JPG
     
    Timothy, Jul 15, 2018
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