What equipment must I have?


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@kelpie: If your pond is not intended for people to spend much or any time in, there's little to worry about using a submersible pump. However, looking for "death by pond pump" examples would be hard to come by because ponds designed for people to be in them are few and a very recent thing.

A better example would probably be electrocutions in swimming pools.

Again, we're talking about pretty low risk in both scenarios. But as it applies to ponds, I see it also as a practical matter. If people will be in the pond with any regular occurrence, then you can get both more safety and lower long term pump and electricity costs by going external. The only cost is a few extra hours of installation time.
 
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hmmm, I mentioned earlier that I'd never heard of this electrocution by submersible pump issue. I did some digging on google and while responses of "Never mix water and electric or you'll die" were easily found, examples of death by pond pump were not. Neither were deaths from electrocution by shower pump. There was a 4 person example with a "fountain pump" but that was found to be due to a lack of any earthing, and IIRC there were other issues at the breaker box contributing to the incident.
The most common failure to submersible is not the fault of the design as much as it is the user pulling on the electrical cord to pull the submersible pump up from below.
 
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One other potential problem with a submersible is there is usualy no fine basket strainer around the pump and that could get a hold of long hair and that's not a pretty picture to think about. Can it be prevented sure with a separation basket where that is illuminated. But even a external if you have main drain most codes call for two to be installed on the same line so if one does grab someone the other drain takes the pressure and not hold someone under
 
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@kelpie: If your pond is not intended for people to spend much or any time in, there's little to worry about using a submersible pump. However, looking for "death by pond pump" examples would be hard to come by because ponds designed for people to be in them are few and a very recent thing.

A better example would probably be electrocutions in swimming pools.

Again, we're talking about pretty low risk in both scenarios. But as it applies to ponds, I see it also as a practical matter. If people will be in the pond with any regular occurrence, then you can get both more safety and lower long term pump and electricity costs by going external. The only cost is a few extra hours of installation time.

I didnt actualy say I searched for "death by pond pumps" I searched for examples of the occurrence, but good idea, lets have a look at "electrocutions in swimming pools";

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the American Red Cross are warning of another hidden danger to swimmers: electrocution. There have been 60 deaths and nearly 50 serious shocks reported over the past 13 years involving electrical hazards in and around swimming pools.

The CPSC is most concerned about faulty underwater lighting; aging electrical wiring that hasn't been inspected in years; the use of sump pumps, power washers, and vacuums that are not grounded; and electrical appliances (such as radios and TVs) and extension cords falling or being pulled into the water. All of these hazards present an even greater risk if the lighting, circuits, and nearby receptacles are not protected by Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs)

NOTE 1: sump pumps are not the same as submersible pumps.
NOTE 2: 110 incidents in 13 years? How Many Pools Are in the United States? There are 10.4 million residential and 309,000 public swimming pools in the United States, according to the Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP).

From that perspective theres a 99.99999% chance of me being ok. I don't see that as a risk but YMMV :)
 
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I didnt actualy say I searched for "death by pond pumps" I searched for examples of the occurrence, but good idea, lets have a look at "electrocutions in swimming pools";

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and the American Red Cross are warning of another hidden danger to swimmers: electrocution. There have been 60 deaths and nearly 50 serious shocks reported over the past 13 years involving electrical hazards in and around swimming pools.

The CPSC is most concerned about faulty underwater lighting; aging electrical wiring that hasn't been inspected in years; the use of sump pumps, power washers, and vacuums that are not grounded; and electrical appliances (such as radios and TVs) and extension cords falling or being pulled into the water. All of these hazards present an even greater risk if the lighting, circuits, and nearby receptacles are not protected by Ground-Fault Circuit-Interrupters (GFCIs)

NOTE 1: sump pumps are not the same as submersible pumps.
NOTE 2: 110 incidents in 13 years? How Many Pools Are in the United States? There are 10.4 million residential and 309,000 public swimming pools in the United States, according to the Association of Pool & Spa Professionals (APSP).

From that perspective theres a 99.99999% chance of me being ok. I don't see that as a risk but YMMV :)
There is no such thing as no risk. Onlyacceptable risk. Every person (and governing body like the NEC) decides for themselves.

At this point, I think we’re just arguing over semantics. A sump pump is a type of submersible pump.

Like I said: Given GFCI protection, risk is low in either case. Risk is lower with external pump.
 

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