Why are ceramic pieces used in filters?


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When I was looking for media for my pond filter, ceramic kept coming up. I have alot of left over from the electronic industry they look just like the ones pond suppliers sell, so I was thinking of adding it to my filter, maybe. Ceramic is hard not porous lava rock, so does any one know what purpose ceramics serve as a filter media?
 
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TheFishGuy

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When I was looking for media for my pond filter, ceramic kept coming up. I have alot of left over from the electronic industry they look just like the ones pond suppliers sell, so I was thinking of adding it to my filter, maybe. Ceramic is hard not porous lava rock, so does any one know what purpose ceramics serve as a filter media?
I have only used ceramic in aquarium canister filters.

and it is highly porous little tubes.

I would of course recommend a bog filter, though lava rock and other bio media is still good :)

what types of ceramic is it? also, pictures would help.
 

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Sometimes the they are also used to disrupt the flow to let larger particulates drop out before the finer filtration stages.
 
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The ceramic media that came with my shower filter was very porous.
 
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Ceramic is hard not porous lava rock, so does any one know what purpose ceramics serve as a filter media?
Ceramic media for aquariums (and ponds) is a special type of porous ceramic material. As the aquarium cycles, the pores of the media slowly get populated with beneficial bacteria which break down the ammonia and nitrites in the water.
 
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Agree with the above. Ceramic media has an enormous surface area for beneficial bacteria to grow. It is hard to fathom the huge amount. It actually replicates the Earth's natural aquifers but on a micro scale. Now, your electronic industry ceramic is another story. Is it impregnated with anything or completely pure? For pond use, make sure to pre-filter the water before it reaches the ceramic disks otherwise, they will become overwhelmed by sediment and debris. Really, ceramic disks are best used in aquariums.
 
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brokensword

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I believe bioballs give the most surface area for colonization per volume. There's many artifical surfaces to use for your bio filter. Some use lava rocks, as well as shreds of plastic, cut up pvc pipe, sponges, etc. A bog essentially gives you the most bang for your buck as pea gravel is a great bio surface, not to mention all the plants that you use to take up the nitrates (which a typical biofilter will not eliminate).

These ceramic/plastic/lava rock pieces shouldn't be cleaned per se as that's where your bacteria grow. If you ever need to clean, just flush with pond/non-chloriated water and put them back.
 
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it is highly porous little tubes.
Ceramic is also impervious and will not bio degrade. Bacteria will grow on any surface . and cermaic is a man made surface . lava rock will effect ph i do not believe ceramic effects ph in any way
I believe bioballs give the most surface area for colonization per volume
I believe it is the plastic strips that have the most surface area in a wet dry filter. especially today with there being so many differant designs in bio balls. but the big advantage is to have the o2 levels so high so bacteria can thrive. I have been pumping A lot of air into my snorkel tube in the bog for two years now to insure that bacteria in my 6 foot deep bog does no suffocate due to using up all the o2
 
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mrsclem

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Ceramic is also impervious and will not bio degrade. Bacteria will grow on any surface . and cermaic is a man made surface . lava rock will effect ph i do not believe ceramic effects ph in any way
Why do you say lava rock effect ph? It has no calcium and is ph neutral. Just asking-
 

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