"fish spawned, water must be fine"

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I have been hearing things like this a lot lately on multiple forums. Also "fish spawned so water must be balanced". Not sure what balanced means exactly...
What do you folks think? Is it a fair statement? Can fish spawn in less that perfect water? And why can't people just purchase a $30 to know the actual water parameters? Knowing the numbers seems much more credible than "fine".
 

addy1

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nah, the problem is it is the truth
 
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i would say fish are more likely to spawn if the water conditions are ideal but as far as goldfish go i think they would spawn in a toilet ive seen so many ppl with goldfish in a fishbowl with no filter and looks like the tank hasnt been cleaned in two yrs and somehow that darn thing is still living as you get into more delicate tropical fish like discus or angels the water quality usually has to be much better in order for them to spawn
 

fishin4cars

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Goldfish can and do spawn in less than ideal water conditions, That does not mean all is fine though. With the spawning alone water parameters can decrease dramatically, then the new added load of fish as they grow can make water quality even worse. the one thing I have noticed is if all the water parameters are good and the water is greaan the spawning can be quite successful. There is more chances that the babies wont get eaten as they can get away from hungry mouths easier, hiding is much easier for them and the new born fry have more to eat and grow on. So all doesn't have to be perfect to get the best results.
 

crsublette

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Yes, fish do spawn in less than perfect water since, as far as I am aware, it is only the patterns in and durations of water temperatures that trigger a spawning, not the water quality, and of course the fish must be sexually mature enough.

For tropical fish, it likely is different since these particular fragile fish already have a low stress tolerance for when water quality goes bad.

For goldfish, here is an interesting article that I have kept bookmarked. How Often Do Goldfish lay eggs, breed, spawn. So, the water temperature pattern has to repeat over a period of days until the goldfish will spawn.


I concur with Fishin.

I watched many videos and read many testimonials and, during and after a spawning, the water quality parameters almost crash due to the very sudden increase in ammonia and subsequent potential increase in nitrite. Does this sudden drop in water parameters suddenly stop the fish from spawning? Nope, even with the degrading water quality, the spawning continues for a few more days and I have actually seen videos of it triggering other fish to spawn even further regardless of the degrading water quality. I think it is all about the water temperature pattern and duration of the pattern.
 

Troutredds

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...or like dying plants blooming, environmental stresses stimulate breeding as a natural defense mechanism. Water temperature surely plays a role, but perhaps breeding is triggered by stress; naturally selected to ensure survival of future generations. Just a thought...
 
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My water test kit measures the usual Ph, nitrite, and ammonia, but not nitrate. Instead, there is a test for phosphate. I realize that both phosphate and nitrate have to be removed, either by plants or by water changes, but what, essentially, is the difference between these two? :dunno:
 

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Jack02 said:
My water test kit measures the usual Ph, nitrite, and ammonia, but not nitrate. Instead, there is a test for phosphate. I realize that both phosphate and nitrate have to be removed, either by plants or by water changes, but what, essentially, is the difference between these two? :dunno:
See 'Nitrate vs. Phosphate" thread started by me.
John
 
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Jack02 said:
My water test kit measures the usual Ph, nitrite, and ammonia, but not nitrate. Instead, there is a test for phosphate. I realize that both phosphate and nitrate have to be removed, either by plants or by water changes, but what, essentially, is the difference between these two? :dunno:
short answer.... nitrate kills fish, phosphate does not.
 

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