I need plants!!

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So it appears I need more plants to help with algae. The pond is 10k gallons, firestone liner, about 5 feet deep at the deepest point. Sooo which ones should I get? Preferably I would like to stick to ones along the shore line instead of fully submerged/ aquatic plants. Do plants along the shoreline help with algae as much as submerged plants? Also how is the best method to plant these? My pond edge has some rocks, can I just wedge the plants in-between the rocks and will they take?

Dont mind the hoses and UV light hanging around, we were trying something temporarily.

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JBtheExplorer

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Depends on where you're located. Personally, I've been a huge of Bog Bean. Would recommend that if it can grow in your area, especially if it's native to your area. Blue Flag Iris is another option. I believe some plants can do well wedged between rocks. I've never had luck that way. All of mine are in pots just below the surface.
 
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Does your pond have shelves? Hopefully it does. You can sit various plants on the shelves. It's best to not use a pot. You want the roots maximum access to the water.
You can use mesh bags instead of pots or create a cavity on the shelf with rocks or gravel, then add the growing medium in the cavity. A lot of us use pure clay kiddie litter as a growing medium. It has to be the pure clay kiddie litter with no perfumes or any other additives. The clay is good for the fish and the water quality. You may get a bit of cloudiness when working with the clay, but it will clear up in a couple days.

Now if your pond doesn't have shelves, your two choices will be to add floating plants and grow plants in between your perimeter rocks. Try to make sure the roots are in the water.
 
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So it appears I need more plants to help with algae. The pond is 10k gallons, firestone liner, about 5 feet deep at the deepest point. Sooo which ones should I get? Preferably I would like to stick to ones along the shore line instead of fully submerged/ aquatic plants. Do plants along the shoreline help with algae as much as submerged plants? Also how is the best method to plant these? My pond edge has some rocks, can I just wedge the plants in-between the rocks and will they take?

You can wedge some marginals in between rocks, creeping jenny immediately comes to mind, but without knowing the USDA Hardiness zone you are in (or at least a state), we can't suggest plants that will work. If the roots are in the water, they will help. If the roots are not in the water or in a bog area that has the water being pushed through it, they won't help as much. Even if you had the whole perimeter surrounded in marginals, I don't think it would do the trick for a pond with that much surface area. I think the general rule is to really control algae your pond's surface needs to be covered by 40-70%. To control algae you need shade or enough plants to uptake all the excess nutrients. In a small pond, tall marginals around the perimeter could be enough, but on a pond that large, I think you'll need plants that cover more of the surface. The point of plants that cover the surface is to provide shade and block the sun, so algae is starved for light in addition to having the plants use the nutrients in the water (algae starved of nutrients). What kind of filtration are you using now? A heavily planted bog area (in addition to marginals) might do the trick if you really want open water. A bog can be designed to blend in and just look like a heavily planted section at one end of the pond. The area to the right in your photo would make a great bog area.
 
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Agree, you need a bog. That area in the upper right of the photo is the absolute perfect spot. In fact it almost looks like there's already a bog there!

Measure the length and width of your pond to find it's surface area (length X width). Your bog surface area should be 30% of that.

Build the bog and your pond will be clear with very little (if any) maintenance.

Grow your plants right in the gravel of the bog. No pots, right in the gravel. You'll have lots of room for plants. If you use native plants or hardy plants, they will come back in the Spring. No worry about getting plants every Spring. No long Summers with green water. You might get green water in the early Spring startup, but it will clear up once the bog is restarted.

Believe me, you will not regret it. You can just sit back and enjoy. No rinsing of filter pads. No backwashing. No changing UV bulbs every season. No other filters or UV lights are needed.
 

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