Neighbor's tree smashed my pond filtration system. Need help picking a new one


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Hello,

I inherited a koi poind when I bought my house a couple years ago. I've been able to keep the pond in good condition but really do not know what i'm doing. My pond is about 4000 gallons, has a top skimmer and also pulls water from the bottom of the pond. The water that is sucked from an external pump and either gets routed to a 400 gallon sand filter or to a set of 3 vortex filters. I believe there is UV filters someplace in the design...

The nieghbors giant tree broke and came crashing down on my filtration system and broke a bunch of PVC pipe,put a hole in the large 400 gallon sand filter, and looked like it smashed up the UV lighting tube thingie.

I always thought the setup was overkill and its been a pain to manage the 3 vortex filters and the large sand filter. For a 4000 gallon pond with two small waterfalls & 8 lg Koi is there a simplier solution that will still keep my pond clear?

I saw this filter as was wondering if this would replace all my filters: http://www.aquaultraviolet.com/products/filters/ultima2/6000 Could I just run my pond lines to this filter and then from here out to my two waterfalls? Would this support my 4000 gallon pond & 8 lg koi? With a filter like the one I linked to is there any need for the standalone vortex or sand filter?

Thanks
Eric
 
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Ruben Miranda

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Hello
When you say large koi haw large would you guess 2 feet or more.
that is a very nice size pond.

and the filter setup you have now I think is better then the one in the link.
I also don't have exerience with this filter but in reading
I would not get it to replace what you already have.
Also the punp you have what is it rated at if it is to small you will need to also by a 6000 gph or better pump for this new filter.
I would always go bigger becuase flow rate on a pump always drops as soon as you hook something to it and as it builds up stuff it sucks up.

Pictures would also help all of us help you.

Ruben
 
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Actually that is exactly the filter I have had running on my 3600 gallon pond. I've had the pond 17 years and this filter about 10 years.

Never a problem with it and recommend it 100%. We also use a UV on it as well though. The pump is about a 6000 GPH pump. We currently keep 15 koi plus a small handful of goldfish. Koi range from about 8"-24" in size.

Easy to backflush. About 5 minutes once a week to clean out the pumps basket and do the backflush. That's it.

I think the key is to make sure you plumb it right. Plumb out all the drains and waste lines so it's just a matter of turning the right valves.

Craig

PS> Have you contacted your homeowners insurance? You should be able to make a claim to collect some money for all that.
 
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"Clean" is a relative term, so I can't say what standard you'd have.

The Utima is a pretty good filter. If you're looking for a store bought solution I'd say that's about as good as it gets. The downside is these types of filters do two things, trap crap and try to act as a bio filter converting ammonia and nitrite fish waste. Unfortunately these two functions are at cross purposes and so these kinds of filters kind of split the difference and do each less well than other filters. However it can do the job well enough depending on how the pond is kept. For example this filter can be fine for 8 fish in 4000 gal pond when the fish are fed once a week, even once a day. But for keeper feeding 8-12 times a day or using an automatic feeder or have high fish loads this type of filter is of little use. Cost of water loss for back washing can be too much for some people.

More complexity than you probably want, but just for background...
The best filter systems imo are component systems. Each component has a specific function allowing it to perform that function without any trade offs. For example, a bottom drain that goes to a sieve filter removes crap from the water column 24/7 before it can decompose into smaller and more difficult stuff to remove. Then a pump moves the water to a sand & gravel filter which traps small particles and from there water goes into a moving bed filter, or Bakki shower filer or Trickle Tower for bio conversion of ammonia and nitrite. From there water goes to a UV filter to kill algae and back to the pond. There are a million variations, but that's what I consider current state of the art.

Vortex filters were more popular years ago. Sieve filters have replaced these.

Sand filters are still tops for removing fine particles, but 400 gal is an old style. Today these are in the 55 gal range and multiple tanks are used if needed. That makes back flushing easier. I don't know why Ruben thought you didn't have a very big pump, maybe another thread? It would take a massive pump to back flush a 400 gal sand filter. But maybe that sand filter never really worked very well (that's my bet). The sand filters today are called "sand and gravel filters" if you want to Google.
 
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Thanks everybody for the information. I"m having a hard time determining what size the external pump i have is now. Most of the signage on the pump is worn and unreadable now... As Waterbug said i'm sure my setup never worked well. I've had issues with the vortex filters which are 150 gallon each and buried in my backyard. The center vortex filter has settled lower which had been causing issues. The water was crystal clear to my eyes. I would sometimes get an algae bloom but it quickly cleared itself up.

There are currently only 8 koi. Half are mid size (18inches) and the other 2 are closer to 24 inches and then a couple really big guys. I would like to get a couple more small koi that have some more interesting color schemes.

I think for now i will try to piece together my filter so they fish can get some water flow going again. I do like the all in one systems since it does seem easier to maintain but I will research some of the standalone filters more before i permanently fix the issue.

I did call my home owners insurance but I'm uncertain if I will make a claim. It seems to me there is only 2 to 3k worth of damage to the pond. My deductible is 1k and I don't think i want to risk a rise in insurance when I have to renew next year.

-Eric
 
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Did you ask them about a tree removal reimbursement? I know on our homeowners policy there was no deductible amount for tree removal due to storm damage. Just a maximum of 1500.00 per incident or storm. I made a claim about 2 yrs for this.

Craig
 
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Ruben Miranda

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Hello

Water Bug Wrote:
I don't know why Ruben thought you didn't have a very big pump, maybe another thread? It would take a massive pump to back flush a 400 gal sand filter

Well I did not know for sure one way or the other about his pump size Just because he has a 400 gal sand filter do's not mean they put in a big enough pump to begin with.
That is why I ask and try not to guess.
Also the filter he is looking into recommends a 6000 gph pump, So if his pump is under that he would need to get a new one. :razz: :razz:

Ruben :razz:
 
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As Waterbug said i'm sure my setup never worked well. I've had issues with the vortex filters which are 150 gallon each and buried in my backyard.
Back years vortex was the all the rage and lots of people said they worked. But whenever I saw one in person they didn't seem to really do much. I think in theory they could work better if flow is just right and also maybe the type of matter being removed.
 

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Home owners insurance covers some damage from trees falling on things as long as it is well documented with pics .Not sure if all policies may have a clause in them that needs a rider for a pond .
 
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"The nieghbors giant tree broke and came crashing down on my filtration system and broke a bunch of PVC pipe,put a hole in the large 400 gallon sand filter, and looked like it smashed up the UV lighting tube thingie."

"I did call my home owners insurance but I'm uncertain if I will make a claim. It seems to me there is only 2 to 3k worth of damage to the pond. My deductible is 1k and I don't think i want to risk a rise in insurance when I have to renew next year."

-Eric
It seems to me that if the tree that did the damage fell from your neighbor's yard then it would be his insurance you would be making the claim against, not yours.
 

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