Stand alone bog


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This is the start of my bog garden. It’s turned hot here, so the digging will have to wait until fall. In the meantime, I enjoy seeing these little cuties outside my kitchen window.View attachment 151829
Are those pitcher plants?
They seem more narrow than the ones I'm used to seeing.
They are so cool looking!

There's a huge nature preserve near me that is a gigantic bog. It's really deep peat that was pushed there from the ice age. There are tons of plants, trees ,etc. that are normally not from this area. Some of the most impressive are the pitcher plants.
They have wooden walkways on top of the peat so you can walk through it.
 
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That’s what I was thinking too. I suppose you don’t want it to become stagnant though. I’ll probably poke a couple then see how fast it drains, poke a few more if necessary.
 

Jhn

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Pitcher plants will grow in a regular gravel bog as well, as long as you have an area where the gravel is raised. Have a couple in mine they don’t really spread out because of the gravel but are doing well, just stuck in the planting material and added a bunch of sphagnum moss around them for it to spread into a little bit. It doesn’t look anything like @GBBUDD’s pitcher plant bog area, which looks awesome but are doing well.
 
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They are babies, and will send out larger pitchers as they get older. That sounds like a wonderful preserve!
Yeah, it's full of all kinds of unusual things not indigenous to the area.

The crazy thing is that you are walking on boardwalks floating on top of the peat.
I forget what the depth of the peat is, but it's crazy deep.

Everything was pushed there by the glaciers.
The guides explain everything and point out all the plants and animal signs.
 

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