Why is there such a hatred for string algae?


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I mean no offense to anyone, but can someone explain why there is such a hatred for string algae?
I mean, it's just another plant, right?
Part of the pond's ecosystem, right?
I admit I don't have an over abundance of it in my pond. So, maybe it grows crazy in some ponds and clogs things up?
I would think the fish would like it. A place to hide. A food source.
I try to keep my pond as natural as possible. Is my water crystal clear all the time? No. Is there algae, moss, etc. Yes.
Is it just me? Tell me the truth...I can handle it!
 
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Ha... good post.

For me it's just a matter of when it gets out of control and can quickly just physically take up too much space in my 1000g pond. The fish periodically would get "stuck" in it.I saw one koi down near the bottom flashing about ... i started thinking i would have to net him... see what's going on .. and treat as needed. But then realized he was just trying to get out of the string algae. I can imagine have some stringing into a gill has to tickle a bit.
 
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Ha... good post.

For me it's just a matter of when it gets out of control and can quickly just physically take up too much space in my 1000g pond. The fish periodically would get "stuck" in it.I saw one koi down near the bottom flashing about ... i started thinking i would have to net him... see what's going on .. and treat as needed. But then realized he was just trying to get out of the string algae. I can imagine have some stringing into a gill has to tickle a bit.
Oh, I didn't think string algae could entangle a fish. Any of it I've touched, just fell apart like mush. Does it get stronger as it matures?
 
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When it masses up it can be an attractive feature allowed to furl its tendrils in a water flow.

Not so attractive in winter, under ice and it all turns black, disintegrates and dies off polluting the water

122044
 

JBtheExplorer

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I think much of the hate for string algae comes from people who are seeking their version of perfection, while they're actually creating something entirely unnatural and imperfect.

My version of a perfect pond includes algae.
 
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I think much of the hate for string algae comes from people who are seeking their version of perfection, while they're actually creating something entirely unnatural and imperfect.

My version of a perfect pond includes algae.
Exactly what I was thinking, but I was worried I would hurt someone's feelings.
Here goes...
I think some people envision their pond to be this perfect sanitized environment. Maybe somewhat like a newly started aquarium.
They will do anything to keep it clear and sanitized. Adding all kinds of toxic chemicals, etc.
They don't mean harm and don't do it intentional.
I don't blame them. They go through all the work, the cost and want to be able see the fish through crystal clear water. They don't realize the water doesn't need to be perfectly sanitized for the fish to be healthy. But, look at any natural lake or pond and none of them are crystal clear.
I don't mean to be harsh and only intend on educating future ponders.
I feel bad every time I hear one of those all too often stories about adding this or adding that and all my fish died.
Some of it might be due to bad advice or someone just wanting to make a profit on selling chemicals. And some from inexperience.
That's why these forums are such a great place for learning.
So many great people here and so much to learn.
 

cas

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So glad I'm not alone. I use to have an aquarium and when I first built my pond, I was one of those that wanted it perfectly clear.

When I have string algae, I do not get the suspended algae. As soon as the string algae goes away, I can end up with green water. I would prefer to have the string algae instead of the suspended algae, but I have learned to leave it alone. Some how nature takes care of things and seems to know what my pond needs.
 
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String algae can quickly completely choke out a stream. I had that happen a few years ago and came back from a two-day vacation to find water flowing over the sides of the stream causing the water level in the pond to drop dangerously low. The only thing that saved the pump was the automatic water filler. It really has nothing to do with looking good it's about keeping things under control. The stuff that grows in the pond doesn't bother me until it kills the water lilies like it did this year. It actually killed almost all of my plants. Nasty stuff be thankful if you don't have any.
 
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The worst thing to buy for a pond is a test kit. You test the water and then what? The cycle begins. Let nature deal with it.
I think the test kit is a good thing to have, it's the person's reaction to the test results that can do harm.
Most water adjustments should be done gradual as not to shock the inhabitants. Adjustments should be done in a natural way without adding chemicals.
Ponds are not swimming pools where you throw in algaecide, Ph up, Ph down, chlorine etc.
 
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String algae can quickly completely choke out a stream. I had that happen a few years ago and came back from a two-day vacation to find water flowing over the sides of the stream causing the water level in the pond to drop dangerously low. The only thing that saved the pump was the automatic water filler. It really has nothing to do with looking good it's about keeping things under control. The stuff that grows in the pond doesn't bother me until it kills the water lilies like it did this year. It actually killed almost all of my plants. Nasty stuff be thankful if you don't have any.
I guess I'm lucky having very little string algae. I remember visiting a friend's pond and admiring the string algae. I thought it looked nice! But, if it grows out of control... I guess too much of anything is bad.
 
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i don't mind the string algae and am happy to know i am not the only one. If it starts getting out of control it is easy to pull out.
 
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i don't mind the string algae and am happy to know i am not the only one. If it starts getting out of control it is easy to pull out.
It's easy to pull apart but it is not easy to remove where it grows on rocks. Not even a wire brush will get it off. Once it starts there is nothing you can do to stop it. Don't let it take hold would be my advice.
 
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I like it. But I can see how it can be a problem for others. I’d think it’d be ok in a pond where folks can keep it in line, but I see how it can clog things. I’ve recently imported some from a local stream to use in my kiddy pool where I’ve got minnow fry, a pair of tadpoles, and put some in with my turtle. All wild caught fish, feeders for the turtle.
 
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Any of it I've touched, just fell apart like mush.
If it's falling apart when you touch it, it's not what people refer to as string algae. String algae is exactly what it sounds like - stringy. It's tough stuff.

And I think many people don't mind a bit of string algae - or algae of any kind for that matter - but it can take over a pond and that's when it becomes a nuisance. What people need to do though is ask themselves why it's there in such abundance. Something is out of balance. Fix the cause and the algae will be manageable.
 
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If it's falling apart when you touch it, it's not what people refer to as string algae. String algae is exactly what it sounds like - stringy. It's tough stuff.

And I think many people don't mind a bit of string algae - or algae of any kind for that matter - but it can take over a pond and that's when it becomes a nuisance. What people need to do though is ask themselves why it's there in such abundance. Something is out of balance. Fix the cause and the algae will be manageable.
Oh! I stand corrected. I thought that stringy stuff that disintegrated in my hand was string algae. I guess it's more of a solid plant than an algae.
 

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