Bog filter failure - has this ever happened to anyone else?


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I’ve been struggling all summer long with murky water. Things took a turn for the worst a week ago when the water became so bad I could barely see the fish. So I started investigating and that’s when I noticed the bog was bubbling rather violently in one spot. I could also hear the pea stone pinging against each other under the surface. So I dug my hands down In the bubbling area and could stick my fingers into a hole in the PVC. So today I drained the pond to just below bog level, dug up the pea stone and pulled out the filter to find a quarter sized hole in the middle of one of the cuts. Has anyone ever seen this before? Any idea why this happened? My cuts were spaced about 4.5” apart. I have new PVC to build a new filter and want to make sure (if I did something wrong with the cuts) that this doesn’t happen again. The filter was only 2.5 years old. Thank you!
 

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No, never in pond use. I have have 'cleaned up' behind someone else who used the wrong pipe in a sprinkler system and that sure looks similar. But let me ask, is the pvc that failed the same as the two pieces (on the left side) of your first image? The second image looks like the internal pressure became too great the the pipe catastrophically failed.
 

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Agree with Stephen Noble looks like the pipe you used isn’t schedule 40, looks like the thinner walled stuff.
 
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No, never in pond use. I have have 'cleaned up' behind someone else who used the wrong pipe in a sprinkler system and that sure looks similar. But let me ask, is the pvc that failed the same as the two pieces (on the left side) of your first image? The second image looks like the internal pressure became too great the the pipe catastrophically failed.
The old filter is sitting next to the new pvc. It’s the same product. 2 inch PVC.
 

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But look how thin the wall of the burst pipe is! And look at the writing on the other pieces. They are both 2”, yes, but they are not the same type of PVC.
 
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But look how thin the wall of the burst pipe is! And look at the writing on the other pieces. They are both 2”, yes, but they are not the same type of PVC.
It’s thin because its completely worn out. That is the only part that is thin is around the hole. Here is the old pvc marked schedule 40.
 

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What I've typically done is to lay the pipe flat on the bottom then to layer around and over, larger stone. In my case, I put 4-6" as a first layer. Then, I put 2" cobble stone on top of that, followed by 12" of pea gravel. I'd think this would allow the water to escape without any pea stone abrading.

Also, I'd make the slits closer together, like 2" or so.

Just an idea.
 
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What I've typically done is to lay the pipe flat on the bottom then to layer around and over, larger stone. In my case, I put 4-6" as a first layer. Then, I put 2" cobble stone on top of that, followed by 12" of pea gravel. I'd think this would allow the water to escape without any pea stone abrading.

Also, I'd make the slits closer together, like 2" or so.

Just an idea.
Definitely will take your advice re: 2 inches between cuts. What size stone did you use for the larger stone (first layer)?
 
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Could it be... chewed?? Just a wild thought.

Also, did you install that with slits up or down?
 
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Could it be... chewed?? Just a wild thought.

Also, did you install that with slits up or down?
I don’t think something would chew it under a foot of pea stone. I think the friction of the stones just wore the plastic down. Maybe my slit was too wide? I don’t know. The slits were up.
 
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Why would the stones even be creating friction... and why in just one spot.? Could the pipe have gotten completely clogged and created so much pressure that it just blew out that spot? In any case, put the pipe in slit side down - that helps keep the holes from getting clogged with silt or small stones.
 

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There almost has to have been a weakness or breakdown somewhere with that piece of pipe. Friction? Friction implies movement. Other than the movement of the water, there shouldn’t be movement. It looks like the blowout happened inside the pipe, forcing the pipe outward. I would not think that a “normal” flow of water would be strong enough to cause this type of damage. Unless the entire manifold system was completely blocked, and all of the water was being forced through this one, single slit....I still can’t imagine that type of damage. And I can’t explain the condition of the water.

Please post a few pictures of your pond, bog combination. I don’t see your bog in the pics you have posted — only your pond.
 
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Some thoughts...
Both legs of your manifold should have clean-out stacks, not just the right as one shown in the first picture. Maybe the left one filled up with muck and put more pressure on the remaining slits. Were any portion of the pipes clogged? I'm guessing no, since you didn't mention that.

Not that there are any specific rules, but I spaced my slits 1-1/2" apart and cut 1/3 through the pipe. Just throwing that out there, I'm no expert, but maybe more slits are better?

As far as the blow-out...that's very strange...the walls of schedule 40 are pretty darn thick.
Maybe the pipe was defective and the wall was thin in that area.
Not trying to blame, just trying to get to the root of the problem...
It almost looks melted. Maybe when you cut the slits there was a lot of heat generated? What did you cut with? Could the blade have been dull? That might create a lot of heat.

Maybe that particular slit was cut too deep and weakened the pipe?

Do they make schedule 80 in smaller sizes? I've seen it in big sizes. If they do, maybe that's the answer.

Hope you get it all worked out and it's good you posted the problem. This discussion will help future bog builds.
 
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Good thought @poconojoe - too much heat while sawing could have melted the PVC a bit, causing a weak spot maybe? And then the pressure built up and blew a hole in it. That's a weird one for sure! @mtravigne how many GPH are you pumping through the bog?

I'm also curious about the nature of the dirt in the pond... it almost looks milky. I'd expect it to be cloudy for a bit but then settle out.
 
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Good question by Lisak1 about the size of your pump. How many GPH is the pump?
I still can't fathom how the PVC around that hole looks so thin and blown out. It looks like it was melted from the inside out. Could that just be wear from the water pushing through? But it's funny since none of the other slits have wear like that at all. Could it be so many of the other slits were clogged and the force of the pump blew out that hole? I'm leaning more towards a manufacturer defect.
 
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Some thoughts...
Both legs of your manifold should have clean-out stacks, not just the right as one shown in the first picture. Maybe the left one filled up with muck and put more pressure on the remaining slits. Were any portion of the pipes clogged? I'm guessing no, since you didn't mention that.

Not that there are any specific rules, but I spaced my slits 1-1/2" apart and cut 1/3 through the pipe. Just throwing that out there, I'm no expert, but maybe more slits are better?

As far as the blow-out...that's very strange...the walls of schedule 40 are pretty darn thick.
Maybe the pipe was defective and the wall was thin in that area.
Not trying to blame, just trying to get to the root of the problem...
It almost looks melted. Maybe when you cut the slits there was a lot of heat generated? What did you cut with? Could the blade have been dull? That might create a lot of heat.

Maybe that particular slit was cut too deep and weakened the pipe?

Do they make schedule 80 in smaller sizes? I've seen it in big sizes. If they do, maybe that's the answer.

Hope you get it all worked out and it's good you posted the problem. This discussion will help future bog builds.
I used a hacksaw (!) to make the slits so I’m sure they were irregular. I also cut halfway through the pipe (and maybe a smidge more). So for the replacement filter, my husband used the chop saw to make even cuts 1/3 of the way through the pipe every 2 inches. Hopefully the consistency of the slits will prevent that from happening again. The pipes themselves were pretty clean, there were no clots or debris in the pipes.
 

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