Bog Filter


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Is your pond totally reliant on a Bog filter?

Since building our Bog filter 3 years ago I would never consider going back to mechanical. Besides providing a more natural system, it is by far the most economical and most effective. My weekly water changes are considerably easier and less time consuming. The bog filter spills into a small still pond before flowing over the waterfall into the creek and exits over the main waterfall into the pond. Bog filters also provides the perfect environment for frogs and my pond plants have flourished. I highly recommend a bog filter and your fish will definitely thank you for it

Please share your thoughts

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Agree.
Before adding the bog, my water was a constant green pea soup.
I had two pressure filters and a UV light, but they were just inadequate.

I know the reason for the green water. It's because I have way too many fish. They just keep multiplying.

When I added the bog, the water cleared up in less than a week.

I sold my two pressure filters and UV light and the water has stayed crystal clear with only the bog running.

The bogs surface area is slightly over 30% of the pond's surface area.

Almost zero maintenance is also a great feature of the bog. No cleaning of filter pads.
 

addy1

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Built my pond in 2010 built the bog in 2010, was told by a bunch it would never work. It works and works great. I can turn the pond on in the spring and never touch it all summer (well except pulling plants that grow too well in the bog) Minimal algae issues, no green water.

I have not used a true filter in years all ponds I have built were filtered by bogs. This one is my best bog build.
 
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addy1

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I was wondering the same thing.
I never do water changes. Ever. And my pond's water is crystal clear (bog), even with a huge fish load.
I have never changed out the water. 11 years now.
 
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The only reasons I can see for doing water changes is if you had a serious contaminant, disease infestation, parasitic infestation or your pond had been neglected for years.

The only reasons I can see for adding water is if you had a leak or you live in a very hot climate with little rain to make up for evaporation.

Just my opinion....
 

addy1

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The only reasons I can see for adding water is if you had a leak or you live in a very hot climate with little rain to make up for evaporation.
I have to add water all summer, with all the surface area and bog plants the water poofs away. Even my hot tub pond, it loses about 1-2 inches a week. Sometimes more.
 
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Love my bog.

But why are you still doing water changes?
This is something I've always done due to waste buildup. Although a bog filter is a great option there's still waste buildup that can possibly lead to methane which is fatal. I also find it very beneficial to clean out my pumps and allow the clean out spout to drain a bit. My fish absolutely loves the volume of oxygen provided by the fresh water as well.

I've never heard of anyone not having the need for water changes however if it works for you that's great!! I'm definitely interested and if you could share some advice I would definitely appreciate it
 
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Jhn

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Like everyone else here have been a big believer in bogs and plants as the only filter a pond needs. Also, like many here I don’t/haven’t ever done water changes on any of my ponds and don’t believe they are necessary in any way to maintain a healthy pond.

I have been keeping ponds for 30 years and have yet to do a water change for any reason other than as was mentioned a contaminant getting in the pond. My current pond is 13 years old and have never done a water change in these 13 years. Regular scheduled Water changes for the sake of water changes and not knowing what you are putting in your pond (ie what is in your source water)can lead to more problems than it solves.

Changing water to reduce waste/methane? How do you know there is waste build up in your system? Methane and hydrogen sulfide comes from anaerobic/ anoxic areas in your pond ie where sludge has built up usually 3” or more thick? If you’d not have this where is this coming from?
Plants and bogs serve as a nutrient banking (the plants) and a biological filter the SSA created by the gravel in the bog provide. Alot of the waste in the water can be tied up in the plants and converted through the nitrogen cycle from the bacteria pop. Present in the pond., making regular water changes deleterious to the stable environment provided by a correctly designed and constructed pond.
 
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I was wondering the same thing.
I never do water changes. Ever. And my pond's water is crystal clear (bog), even with a huge fish load.
Wow! I must be in the minority surrounding water changes. Before adding the bog filter we consulted with our local nursery which installs ponds as well. They recommended weekly water changes for optimal health and pump maintenance. A few of our neighbors does this as well. We built the pond ourselves with the bog filter above ground if that could be the difference.

If anyone could share your bog filter experience, I would definitely appreciate it.
 
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Like everyone else here have been a big believer in bogs and plants as the only filter a pond needs. Also, like many here I don’t/haven’t ever done water changes on any of my ponds and don’t believe they are necessary in any way to maintain a healthy pond.

I have been keeping ponds for 30 years and have yet to do a water change for any reason other than as was mentioned a contaminant getting in the pond. My current pond is 13 years old and have never done a water change in these 13 years. Regular scheduled Water changes for the sake of water changes and not knowing what you are putting in your pond (ie what is in your source water)can lead to more problems than it solves.

Changing water to reduce waste/methane? How do you know there is waste build up in your system? Methane and hydrogen sulfide comes from anaerobic/ anoxic areas in your pond ie where sludge has built up usually 3” or more thick? If you’d not have this where is this coming from?
Plants and bogs serve as a nutrient banking (the plants) and a biological filter the SSA created by the gravel in the bog provide. Alot of the waste in the water can be tied up in the plants and converted through the nitrogen cycle from the bacteria pop. Present in the pond., making regular water changes deleterious to the stable environment provided by a correctly designed and constructed pond.
What size is your pond? Ours is
2,200 gallons
 
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I want to clarify my weekly water changes consists of 10 to 20% otherwise it's drained 40% to 50% for opening in Spring. Curious as to leaves and other plant debris, are they left to rot in the water and how do pumps avoid becoming clogged causing possible damage. I could never imagine ignoring these issues unless the pond is maintained by professionals or utilizes a natural waterway which mine is most certainly Not. I get more enjoyment from maintaining my pond and taking an occasional dip with my fish rather than for my viewing pleasure nor impressing my neighbors otherwise to each their own.
 

addy1

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My pond never gets drained in the spring or fall, never gets water changes. I do now and then scoop the bottom seldom get anything off of it, except trapdoor snails. It appears that any vegetation is consumed by the plants wanting nutrients. Seldom get anything in the net. My pump is external. My draw for the water is about a foot from the bottom.

Maintenance, pulling plants the bog, trimming lilies now and then, feeding the fish now and then, fighting water snakes lol . We are on a well our ph is 5.3 doing a large water change could kill the fish off. It took a year of being fishless for the pond water to be at a decent ph for fish. It gets fresh water when it rains, or if I need to fluff the level due to evaporation etc.
 
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I want to clarify my weekly water changes consists of 10 to 20% otherwise it's drained 40% to 50% for opening in Spring. Curious as to leaves and other plant debris, are they left to rot in the water and how do pumps avoid becoming clogged causing possible damage. I could never imagine ignoring these issues unless the pond is maintained by professionals or utilizes a natural waterway which mine is most certainly Not. I get more enjoyment from maintaining my pond and taking an occasional dip with my fish rather than for my viewing pleasure nor impressing my neighbors otherwise to each their own.
As stated, I never do water changes.
This is one of those opinion subjects.
It's best to do what you feel is right for your pond and you.

I feel my pond is now almost self sustaining as far as the water goes.
The only maintenance I do is pull tropicals, trim the winter hardy plants and slowly scoop the bottom with a net in the fall. I also put a net up to prevent the leaves from getting in the water.
In the Spring I slowly scoop the bottom again for any possible debris build up.

You have to be careful when doing water changes. Things like temperature and the parameters of your home's water supply come into play. Plus, all that liquid gold you are throwing out contains all kinds of beneficial bacteria, microorganisms, etc. that are part of the pond's natural ecosystem.

I also, I keep my submersible pump off the bottom so it doesn't suck up any debris that may have settled down there.
 

Jhn

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I want to clarify my weekly water changes consists of 10 to 20% otherwise it's drained 40% to 50% for opening in Spring. Curious as to leaves and other plant debris, are they left to rot in the water and how do pumps avoid becoming clogged causing possible damage. I could never imagine ignoring these issues unless the pond is maintained by professionals or utilizes a natural waterway which mine is most certainly Not. I get more enjoyment from maintaining my pond and taking an occasional dip with my fish rather than for my viewing pleasure nor impressing my neighbors otherwise to each their own.
My current pond is roughly 20000gallons, (with probably 150-200 fish) my old pond at the previous home was around 5000 gallons. Never did water changes on any of them, don’t lose fish to poor water quality issues, now predation is a different story.

Pumps don’t clog if they are in intake bays and skimmers, or kept off the bottom. Not everything is skimmed out of the pond, but cleaning out the intake bay and skimmers keeps the pond clean, aquatic plant debris I wade into the pond and pull it out.
You aren’t ignoring issues if the issues aren’t there to begin with. If one enjoys maintenance and water changes then more power to you. Not crapping on anyone that does water changes, just saying they aren’t necessary.

As I said why are you doing water changes? reducing methane and hydrogen sulfide build up is not a reason to do it. Can be a reason to clean pond bottom if necessary but not a water change.

Water changes are done to maintain water quality, if water quality is being maintained via proper circulation and filtration, it eliminates the need to do them. Doing water changes to just do them, without understanding whether it is necessary, what is in your source water, can be just as dangerous not doing them.

@LuvKoi to be clear I am not telling you not to do them, I am saying understand why you do them. Is it necessary for your pond IDK maybe it is, is it necessary for my ponds no it isnt.
 
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