Difference between Shubunkin and Comet?

Discussion in 'Fish & Koi Talk' started by michey1st, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. michey1st

    sissy sissy

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    I wonder because a pond is so different so which will live longer .Pampered fish in a controlled atmosphere or fish that learn to live no matter the conditions .Look at colleens fish they are older .Mine are now 12 years old and that is just in my pond ,not sure the age when I got them .I saw one comment from a pond builder that fish in a pond can live to be 50+ years old .That was koi also
     
    sissy, Sep 2, 2017
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  2. michey1st

    Faebinder

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    My oldest fish is a 4 year old red/black male shubukin (12"). My biggest goldfish is a 2 year old female red/white comet (14"). I don't take credit for either cause I bought the shubunkin when it was 3 years old and the female is from dandy orandas half a year ago.
     
    Faebinder, Sep 2, 2017
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  3. michey1st

    Nyboy

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    What is truly amazing is they lived the 1st part of life in a bowl. I believe the fishtank with filter came years later. Super tough fish
     
    Nyboy, Sep 2, 2017
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  4. michey1st

    Faebinder

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    The consensus out there is that fish in a pond will grow bigger and live longer than fish in an aquarium.

    Of course I expect fish in a ok aquarium will live longer than out there in the wild. So an aquarium is still better health wise the. Being out there.
     
    Faebinder, Sep 2, 2017
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  5. michey1st

    IPA

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    Strictly in regards to long single tailed variety of goldfish, I believe a comet can be all gold, yellow, or have any amount of white including all white. If it has blue or black it becomes a shubunkin. Until there is a similar organization to fish as there is a.k.c. to dog breeds I believe there is no single easy answer to the question.

    Taken from:
    http://www.fishpondinfo.com/fish/gfbreed.htm

    *Common - single tail; no adornments; usually natural bronze or reddish orange with white on the fin tips but may be other colors; picture
    *Comet - single long tail; no adornments; essentially long finned common goldfish; usually orange with or without white or black on fins; often change colors as age
    Shubunkin (original) - single short tail; no adornments; mix of white, red/orange, and blue/black
    *Bristol Shubunkin - single long tail; no adornments; mix of white, red/orange, and blue/black
    **London Shubunkin - single short tail; no adornments; mix of white, red/orange, and blue/black; known for its intense blue
    *Fantail - double tail; fat bodied; red, white, calico, or any combination
    ***Veiltail - double long tail; fat bodied; red, white, calico, or any combination
    ***Lionhead or Ranchu - short double tail; no dorsal fin; fat bodied; hood or growth on head; red, white, calico, or any combination
    **Oranda - long double tail; lionhead with dorsal fin; less fat bodied; hood or growth on head; red, white, orange-yellow, red cap (red just on hood), calico, black, blue (gray), chocolate (bronze), brown, or any combination; picture blue oranda; picturecalico oranda with torn fins; picture red cap oranda
    ***Telescope eyed - double long tail; with or without dorsal fin; fat bodied; large eyes; developed from veiltail; red, white, calico, or any combination
    **Black Moor - double tail; deep black color; large eyes; essentially a black telescope-eyed goldfish
    ***Bubble-eye - double tail; fat bodied; no dorsal fin; large fragile sacks around eyes filled with fluid; developed from celestial; red, white, calico, or any combination
    ***Pearl scale - double short tail; fat bodied; protruding scales as if fish has dropsy; red, white, yellow, calico, black, chocolate, or any combination
    **Pompoms - double tail; fat bodied; no dorsal fin to be "prized" fish; may have other adornments; pompom like growths near nostrils; red, white, calico, or any combination
    ***Celestial - double tail; no dorsal fin; upturned fragile large eyes as adult; red, silver, orange-yellow, white, or any combination (usually metallic)
    ***Wakin - double short tail; bright colored; yellow, orange, white, or red-orange and white
    ***Peacocktail - tail like a butterfly; developed from Wakin; red, white, calico, or any combination
    ***Fringe tail - double large tail; fat bodied; hump on back; red, white, or any combination
    ***Albino doll - double tail; fat bodied; large eyes; albino telescope eyed-like fish
     
    IPA, Sep 4, 2017
    #25
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  6. michey1st

    moby

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    Here in the UK long finned slim fish that are red/white or yellow/white comets are referred to as Sarasas. As far as I'm aware, our Bristol shubunkins have slightly longer fuller fins than the stockily built London and very rounded single tails that are in the shape of a 'B'.

    A less common shubunkin over here is the Cambridge Blue which is as it's name implies, is mainly blue in colour, however, it isn't a recognised breed by the fish officianados.
    Nacreous scales and their multi coloured calico colour pattern are the most distinctive features of shubunkins.
     
    moby, Sep 4, 2017
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