Green pond water


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Wow! For shiners? They are neat looking and really popular bait here. Actually there are some cool minnows out there. The northern mudminnow being a favorite. Can’t wait to see the project.
I can't find many sellers of decent cold water fish here. All fish stores seem to sell basic goldfish, koi or exotic fish for indoor tanks.

I have 5 rainbow shiners in a 100l aquarium atm heated to 25c hoping they start breeding but at the moment they havnt even coloured up yet.

I can't find much information on how to get them to breed so I could be waiting a year
Anyone here have any knowledge of them?

I think the reason we don't have cheap buckets of bait is because we're not allowed to use live bait from another body of water.

We are only allowed to use live bait caught from the place ur fishing. I believe it's silly environmental laws here. So nobody mass breeds minnows for that
 
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Jhn

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Assuming you have Notropsis Chrosomus, is a minnow found in streams in the southern U.S. Mimic their native habitat, ie put a power head against one side of the aquarium and have it blow across the length of the tank. Maintaining water quality and they should spawn.

Keep in mind they are egg scatterers, so they will eat a lot of the eggs unless you can figure out a way to separate them from the eggs.

I would lower the water temp to the lower 70’s (Fahrenheit) since they are a cold water fish, as well.

I can understand laws not allowing non native species for bait or release in general. If they didnt create these laws, there would be the potential for non native species gaining footholds where they don’t belong outcompeting native species for available food and habitat. Have seen it happen numerous times here in the United States, whether accidental or intentional release. Once the non native species gain a foothold it is impossible to get them out.
 
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Assuming you have Notropsis Chrosomus, is a minnow found in streams in the southern U.S. Mimic their native habitat, ie put a power head against one side of the aquarium and have it blow across the length of the tank. Maintaining water quality and they should spawn.

Keep in mind they are egg scatterers, so they will eat a lot of the eggs unless you can figure out a way to separate them from the eggs.

I would lower the water temp to the lower 70’s (Fahrenheit) since they are a cold water fish, as well.

I can understand laws not allowing non native species for bait or release in general. If they didnt create these laws, there would be the potential for non native species gaining footholds where they don’t belong outcompeting native species for available food and habitat. Have seen it happen numerous times here in the United States, whether accidental or intentional release. Once the non native species gain a foothold it is impossible to get them out.
When I see them colour up I'll put them in a sort of basket on the top of the tank with holes in the bottom so the eggs fall through.

I have an air pump pushing 10lpm through a small filter which causes a good flow.

What kind of power head do you recommend?
 

Jhn

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Just anything that moves water, to create flow mimicking a flowing stream.

I’ve used maxi jet and seio in the past and are pretty inexpensive. I would get one that magnet mounts on the side of the tank. Suction cups eventually fail.
 
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Yeah I think what I already have does exactly that it basically uses air to create an airlift pump and pushes out the air and the water on the surface of the water and creates a good flow.

I've went out today and bought 20 canary goldfish for the pond so that the plants get the nutrients they need to keep them growing. They are currently about 2 inches so not sure how big they will be by November when I get the trout.

The guy in the store seemed to think they would be 6-7 inches by end of summer if we have a decent summer this year... I don't know if that's the case but that will make sure the trout can't eat them
 
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Since putting in those gold fish a new potential problem has come to light.

Due to the shape of the pond there is some quite large folds which aren't getting pushed back by the force of the water. They are hiding in that fold.

Could this cause any problems for larger fish or will they be ok?
 
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I've done a water test and I have 0 nitrates in the pond.

People say adding plants starves the algae of nitrates so you don't have green water.

Can someone explain to me them how my water is green and I can't see very deep now even though my nitrates are 0?
 
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Found this article you might find interesting, but the take away for me was the following quote:

"At first, to know what causes algae, we’ll have to know about algae. There are normally two stages of every type of algae. The first stage is algae spore and the later one is algae. You can compare it to a butterfly. The first stage of the butterfly is a caterpillar and the later one is a full grown butterfly. We know, that the characteristics of the caterpillar are different from the butterfly. Caterpillar lives on vegetation, but a butterfly doesn’t. Similar is the case with algae. Algae spores eat ammonia while full grown algae eats nitrate and phosphate."

http://www.aquariumplantfertilizer.com/2016/12/which-one-causes-algae-nitrate.html
 
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Found this article you might find interesting, but the take away for me was the following quote:

"At first, to know what causes algae, we’ll have to know about algae. There are normally two stages of every type of algae. The first stage is algae spore and the later one is algae. You can compare it to a butterfly. The first stage of the butterfly is a caterpillar and the later one is a full grown butterfly. We know, that the characteristics of the caterpillar are different from the butterfly. Caterpillar lives on vegetation, but a butterfly doesn’t. Similar is the case with algae. Algae spores eat ammonia while full grown algae eats nitrate and phosphate."

http://www.aquariumplantfertilizer.com/2016/12/which-one-causes-algae-nitrate.html
But my ammonia is 0 aswell lol.

I wondering if I should bite the bullet and get UV
 

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The algae is consuming your nitrates which is why you are getting a zero reading. Algae is beneficial to the pond as it is establishing itself or even if it gets out of balance down the road. Patience, it will clear on its own.

It’s not just consuming nutrients in the pond, as I said before it is establishing the base of the food chain.

Free floating algae isn’t the only thing growing in the water, there is also phytoplankton establishing its population then will come zooplankton and so on. Using a UV will short circuit establishing a natural balance in the pond.
 
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The algae is consuming your nitrates which is why you are getting a zero reading. Algae is beneficial to the pond as it is establishing itself or even if it gets out of balance down the road. Patience, it will clear on its own.

It’s not just consuming nutrients in the pond, as I said before it is establishing the base of the food chain.

Free floating algae isn’t the only thing growing in the water, there is also phytoplankton establishing its population then will come zooplankton and so on. Using a UV will short circuit establishing a natural balance in the pond.
Thanks for explaining.
How long does it usually take for the water to become crystal clear?

Also since I don't have a skimmer should I be netting out any fallen leaves etc or will it be ok to simply sink to the bottom over time?
 
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You should be removing as many of the fallen leaves as you can because when they decompose they'll only add more ammonia (and eventually nitrates) for the system to deal with which could cause more algae issues in the future.
 
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I am 4 years into converting my swimming pool into a pond. I added mosquito fish first, to avoid that issue. In Florida, we are pretty much choosing between Tilapia and catfish if we want to eat the residents. I started with 100 channel cats, $30 worth. Lost a few to the blue herons and bullfrogs, but we have eaten 20 now and there are about the same number left. They are about 6 lbs now, and unfortunately not self-cleaning. Other than that, they are fun. I had green water for a month or two, but finally gave in to the advice to just shade out the algae. Hyacinths were the cure.... they grow fast and completely covered the pool in about a month. Beautiful blue flowers are a plus. They are cold sensitive, and die back in the winter somewhat. I have to compost lots of them, but they do make good mulch. Now you can see all the way to the bottom, even on the 8 foot deep end. I have a few videos on youtube.
 
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I am 4 years into converting my swimming pool into a pond. I added mosquito fish first, to avoid that issue. In Florida, we are pretty much choosing between Tilapia and catfish if we want to eat the residents. I started with 100 channel cats, $30 worth. Lost a few to the blue herons and bullfrogs, but we have eaten 20 now and there are about the same number left. They are about 6 lbs now, and unfortunately not self-cleaning. Other than that, they are fun. I had green water for a month or two, but finally gave in to the advice to just shade out the algae. Hyacinths were the cure.... they grow fast and completely covered the pool in about a month. Beautiful blue flowers are a plus. They are cold sensitive, and die back in the winter somewhat. I have to compost lots of them, but they do make good mulch. Now you can see all the way to the bottom, even on the 8 foot deep end. I have a few videos on youtube.
Would you mind posting the links, @macktyner?
 
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