How are you dealing with Covid-19 (Novel Coronavirus) ?


Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
9,965
Reaction score
10,444
Location
Northern IL
Showcase(s):
1
I'm honestly curious. For those opposed to measures taken to date, what are your ideas for control of the virus and reopening of schools, nursing homes, businesses etc. I am respectfully curiousous.
I typed a really long answer @Tula - but I've said plenty on this thread so I will just keep it short.

Sweden. That's what I would have done. What they did. They had good medical advice, good scientific advice, good economic advice. They were willing to do what no other country would do and it paid off.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,309
Reaction score
4,080
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6 A
Country
United States
Now you've peaked my interest, I'll have to read up on Sweeden.

I'm at Mom's house as we're readying it for sale , so much packing etc.....but getting stuff done !
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2016
Messages
3,147
Reaction score
3,009
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
smhiputer.gif
I was just wondering... am I the only one that's stacking up on fish food for next year fearing a shortage due to Covid-19?

The expiration date so far is 2023, so I have nothing to lose there, also bought off season the protein food I get is on sale for a third of the cost, so it's a win win situation.

So far I got 4 - 8lb buckets that should be enough for the whole season, I'm thinking I should get some wheat germs as well...yup, I'm paranoid!
 
  • Wow
Reactions: j.w

TheFishGuy

( Insert something funny )
Joined
Jul 9, 2020
Messages
568
Reaction score
291
Location
Colorado
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
4b or 5a
Country
United States
View attachment 134634I was just wondering... am I the only one that's stacking up on fish food for next year fearing a shortage due to Covid-19?

The expiration date so far is 2023, so I have nothing to lose there, also bought off season the protein food I get is on sale for a third of the cost, so it's a win win situation.

So far I got 4 - 8lb buckets that should be enough for the whole season, I'm thinking I should get some wheat germs as well...yup, I'm paranoid!
wow! that is a lot of food, I only feed my outside fish when I feel like it, ( plus restock them with 1k duckweed every month or so and they do fine soooooo.

as for the inside fish, I am almost out of the container of food for the 60 gallon, but that is going bye bye anyway, so that food won't even be needed,

and saltwater stuff, food is to expensive and expires too fast ( like a couple of weeks, with lrs reef frenzy ) so I can't really stack it up...

in other words, no I am not prepared for a fish food shortage in any way at any time.
 

j.w

I Love my Goldies
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
28,158
Reaction score
16,872
Location
Arlington, Washington
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
USDA 8a
Country
United States
I have a good supply for my goldfish in a metal container in the garage but I hardly ever feed them so I'm not sure how long this food will stay good. You have big koi tho @Gemma so they will prolly pig it out fast!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 4, 2019
Messages
223
Reaction score
127
Location
Winchester, VA
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
Ran across this article on Sweden a couple of days ago. I'll just paste it here since I don't know if everyone has access to the New York Times.

The only country I know of that has really been successful with this problem is New Zealand. Others aren't willing to do what they did to stop the spread.

Making sense of Sweden
The White House event to celebrate Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination — a gathering that appears to have spread the coronavirus — would have violated the law in Sweden.​
It was too large. More than 200 people attended the Barrett celebration. In Sweden, public events cannot include more than 50 people. Anyone who organizes a larger gathering is subject to a fine or up to six months in prison.​
If you’ve been following the virus news out of Sweden, this fact may surprise you. Sweden has become notorious for its laissez-faire response. Its leaders refused to impose a lockdown in the spring, insisting that doing so was akin to “using a hammer to kill a fly.” They also actively discouraged mask wearing.​
Ever since, people in other countries who favor a more lax approach have held up Sweden as a model. Recently, as new cases have surged in other European countries, some of Sweden’s defenders have claimed vindication.​
How are you supposed to make sense of all this? Several readers have asked me that question, and the answers point to some lessons for fighting the virus. I think there are three key ones from Sweden:​
1. It is not a success story. Over all, Sweden’s decision to let many activities continue unabated and its hope that growing immunity to the virus would protect people does not look good. The country has suffered more than five times as many deaths per capita as neighboring Denmark and about 10 times as many as Finland or Norway.​
“It was a terrible idea to do what they did,” Janet Baseman, an epidemiologist at the University of Washington, told me.​
By The New York Times | Sources: Johns Hopkins University, World Bank​
2. But Sweden did more than some people realize. It closed schools for students ages 16 and older. It encouraged residents to keep their distance from one another. And it imposed the ban on big gatherings, which looks especially smart now.​
Compared with other viruses, this one seems especially likely to spread in clusters. Many infected people don’t infect a single other person, while “as few as 10 to 20 percent of infected people may be responsible for as much as 80 to 90 percent of transmission,” The Atlantic’s Zeynep Tufekci has explained.​
Given this, it’s less surprising that Sweden’s recent virus performance looks mediocre rather than horrible.​
By The New York Times | Sources: Johns Hopkins University, World Bank​
3. Swedish officials have been right to worry about “sustainability.” Strict lockdowns bring their own steep costs for society. With a vaccine at least months away, societies probably need to grapple with how to restart activities while minimizing risk.​
Sweden’s leaders do not seem to have found the ideal strategy, but they are asking a reasonable question. “We see a disease that we’re going to have to handle for a long time,” Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s top epidemiologist, told The Financial Times, “and we need to build up systems for doing that.”​
The fact that Sweden is no longer an extreme outlier in new virus cases — even as life there looks more normal than in most places — offers a new opportunity to assess risk.​
 

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
38,594
Reaction score
22,931
Location
Frederick, Maryland
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
I have some old fish food, been feeding the critters with it, the fish hardly ever get any, they are all fat and sassy. They are not koi, my pond is not plant or critter free. There is plenty of food for the fish.
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2013
Messages
5,309
Reaction score
4,080
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6 A
Country
United States
I usually go through 11 lbs per season for my 4 koi, but this year they ate more !!! Of course they are getting bigger so it stands to reason.
 

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2010
Messages
38,594
Reaction score
22,931
Location
Frederick, Maryland
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
hummmmmmmmmmm about about a cup full maybe a summer. I did feed the fan tails to see if I could get a few fry, so far have seen 3.
 
Ad

Advertisements

mrsclem

mrsclem
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
3,952
Reaction score
3,528
Location
st. mary's county, md.
Hardiness Zone
7A
Country
United States
I have a vacuum sealer so i buy in bulk and seal my fish food. I actually have 10 lbs of medicated food that I bought right before they stopped selling it.
 

brokensword

Not all those who wander are lost
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
982
Reaction score
792
Location
Michigan
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
I've tried to buy my food now in bulk (100+ gf and 20 koi--most small to med size) to save $$ and as I was running out this summer, bought 25lbs of the 1/4" pellet. I knew I'd have most of this for next summer. THEN, I saw an ad for bulk food where the price per lb was half. Too good to pass up, even though its a FIFTY POUND bag...so, went and got that too. Thank God I resurrected an old freezer in the basement as I doubt it would have lasted beyond next summer when I probably only need 40 lbs total! And I only feed once a day during the summer.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Jhn

Joined
Jul 3, 2017
Messages
1,159
Reaction score
1,065
Location
Maryland
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
I've tried to buy my food now in bulk (100+ gf and 20 koi--most small to med size) to save $$ and as I was running out this summer, bought 25lbs of the 1/4" pellet. I knew I'd have most of this for next summer. THEN, I saw an ad for bulk food where the price per lb was half. Too good to pass up, even though its a FIFTY POUND bag...so, went and got that too. Thank God I resurrected an old freezer in the basement as I doubt it would have lasted beyond next summer when I probably only need 40 lbs total! And I only feed once a day during the summer.
i did that too... bought a 25lb. Bag of pellet this spring. Then bought 50 lb. Bag because it was a good deal. I burned through 50lbs of food this summer feeding every other day or so. Still have a 25lb. Bag in the garage. Have a large Pond, but have a lot of fish that are getting big now and 7 terrapins with the net protecting them. I can’t count the number of goldfish or small koi and orfes in there. It’s a lot though.....to answer the original question a few posts back...not really worried about running out of food for the fish due to COVID, though.
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2010
Messages
1,048
Reaction score
498
Location
Troy, Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United States
I only have 2 Koi, the rest are comets. I had to buy more food this year because of Covid. Every Spring I give away most of my comets. This year because of Covid, I didn't. I have a pond full to say the least. So, yea, more money spent on food this year.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
3,685
Reaction score
3,122
Location
Ct
Hardiness Zone
6b
Country
United States
What has happened to people that even when the facts are put right in front of them if some Jackass from the media says oh no thats not true ....they decide to follow like puppy dogs. THE MEDICAL BAIL OUT BEOFE A BAILOUT WAS EVEN PASSED WAS HOSPITALS. S O THEY COULD KEEP THERE DOORS OPEN AS WE ALL NEED THEM. THEY GET PAID $1700.00 DOLLARS FOR EACH AND EVERY CASE THAT THE HOSPITAL DEALS WITH WHERE THE PATIENT DIES FROM COVID-19 DO THE M A T H NO ONE IS MONITORING THESE NUMBER THEY JUST GET PAID THEY DID CATCH HOSPITAL AFTER HOSPITAL INFLATING THESE NUMBERS BUT IT WAS DISMISSED. DR'S WERE COMING FORWARD SAYING THEY WERE PUSHED TO SAY PATIENTS DIED FROM COVID WHEN THEY WERE HIT BY A TRUCK........ THE CDC FINALY ADMITTED WE SHUT DOWN THE COUNTRY FOR NO REASON IT DOESN'T WORK ..... GEE THANKS WISH WE SAW THAT!!! WALMARTS DEPOTS ETC HAVE ALL BEEN OPEN THE WHOLE TIME AND THEY HAVE ALL REPORTED HOW THEY HAVE HUGEEEEEEEE NUMBERS OF EMPLOYES WHO HAVE DIED AFTER ALL THEY ARE ALL THE PICTURES OF HEALTH.... N O T




By The New York Times | Sources: Johns Hopkins University, World Bank​
2. But Sweden did more than some people realize. It closed schools for students ages 16 and older. It encouraged residents to keep their distance from one another. And it imposed the ban on big gatherings, which looks especially smart now.​
Compared with other viruses, this one seems especially likely to spread in clusters. Many infected people don’t infect a single other person, while “as few as 10 to 20 percent of infected people may be responsible for as much as 80 to 90 percent of transmission,” The Atlantic’s Zeynep Tufekci has explained.​
Given this, it’s less surprising that Sweden’s recent virus performance looks mediocre rather than horrible.​
By The New York Times | Sources: Johns Hopkins University, World Bank​
3. Swedish officials have been right to worry about “sustainability.” Strict lockdowns bring their own steep costs for society. With a vaccine at least months away, societies probably need to grapple with how to restart activities while minimizing risk.​
Sweden’s leaders do not seem to have found the ideal strategy, but they are asking a reasonable question. “We see a disease that we’re going to have to handle for a long time,” Anders Tegnell, Sweden’s top epidemiologist, told The Financial Times, “and we need to build up systems for doing that.”​
The fact that Sweden is no longer an extreme outlier in new virus cases — even as life there looks more normal than in most places — offers a new opportunity to assess risk.​
[/QUOTE]
 
Last edited:

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top