How do I plant plants in the pond?


Jkm

Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Messages
55
Reaction score
40
Location
Rathdrum, ID
Hardiness Zone
5-6
Country
United States
This is my first summer with the pond, and most of my planting has been unsuccessful. I’m in north Idaho, zone 5, and I’d really like to populate the pond with perennials. But I don’t know how to plant them. The attached pics show parts of the perimeter of the pond. I wanted to do a lot of bare root planting in the rocks, but most of those plants eventually died.

So how, exactly, do I plant anything in that rock perimeter around the pond? Or anywhere else in the pond? I see so many beautiful ponds and water gardens here that there must be procedures and techniques of which I am unaware.

Can anyone tell me how they do it? I need a lot more plants...
5A8AAB88-F3D5-4A84-A3E0-EA1D804B26E7.jpeg
EFFD5D0F-45EA-461A-A53B-D5A61B101A0C.jpeg
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 12, 2009
Messages
880
Reaction score
500
Location
Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania
Hardiness Zone
6a
There are a lot of methods.
I see you have rocks sitting in shallow water. You can arrange some of those rocks to create a pocket where you can put clay kitty litter as a planting medium. You use it instead of soil, but you have to make sure it's pure clay, bentonite or fullers earth. No purfumes, just pure clay. It's usually the cheap plain kitty litter. A few plants I have planted in my pond are Aquatic Mint, Lizards Tail, and a gorgeous Marsh Marigold. They survive my Pennsylvania winters too.

You can buy or make mesh planting bags that can contain the kitty litter and still allow the water to circulate through to the roots. Its important to not confine the plants to a solid pot.

You can grow plants in the surrounding soil and spread them into the water. Creeping Jenny is good for that. Also Parrot's Feather. My Creeping Jenny comes back every year as long as it's planted in the soil.

I stick Parrot's Feather in between my surrounding rocks in a way where the roots are in the water.

Then there are the floating plants that don't need any soil. Water Hyacinths, Water Lettuce, Water Spangle, Fairy Moss. These are tropical and don't survive my winters.

There are so many more plants and hopefully others here can list them for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jkm

cas

Joined
Apr 20, 2015
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
2,043
Location
NE Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United States
I just stuffed my aquatic mint with the little bit of soil that came with it between the rocks . This is how it looks after 2 years. It has spread between the rocks and is coming up in other places.

plants - mint 2019-6-10.JPG


For my forget-me-nots, I did what poconojoe mentioned - I made a little pocket out of rocks to put some kitty litter in and then stuffed a stem of forget-me-nots with some roots. It is on the right in the picture below. The blue flag iris are planted in an open weave basket and placed on a shelf in the pond. This picture is from the spring so you can see the pocket that the forget-me-nots are growing in.

plants - blue flag iris and forget me nots 2018-5-12.JPG


This is the forget-me-nots now.

plants - iris and forget-me-nots 2019-7-24.JPG
 

Jkm

Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Messages
55
Reaction score
40
Location
Rathdrum, ID
Hardiness Zone
5-6
Country
United States
There are a lot of methods.
I see you have rocks sitting in shallow water. You can arrange some of those rocks to create a pocket where you can put clay kitty litter as a planting medium. You use it instead of soil, but you have to make sure it's pure clay, bentonite or fullers earth. No purfumes, just pure clay. It's usually the cheap plain kitty litter. A few plants I have planted in my pond are Aquatic Mint, Lizards Tail, and a gorgeous Marsh Marigold. They survive my Pennsylvania winters too.

You can buy or make mesh planting bags that can contain the kitty litter and still allow the water to circulate through to the roots. Its important to not confine the plants to a solid pot.

You can grow plants in the surrounding soil and spread them into the water. Creeping Jenny is good for that. Also Parrot's Feather. My Creeping Jenny comes back every year as long as it's planted in the soil.

I stick Parrot's Feather in between my surrounding rocks in a way where the roots are in the water.

Then there are the floating plants that don't need any soil. Water Hyacinths, Water Lettuce, Water Spangle, Fairy Moss. These are tropical and don't survive my winters.

There are so many more plants and hopefully others here can list them for you.
So the parrots feather doesn’t have to float in the pond? I can plant it in the dirt outside the pond and let it grow into the pond?
 

Jkm

Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Messages
55
Reaction score
40
Location
Rathdrum, ID
Hardiness Zone
5-6
Country
United States
I just stuffed my aquatic mint with the little bit of soil that came with it between the rocks . This is how it looks after 2 years. It has spread between the rocks and is coming up in other places.

View attachment 123790

For my forget-me-nots, I did what poconojoe mentioned - I made a little pocket out of rocks to put some kitty litter in and then stuffed a stem of forget-me-nots with some roots. It is on the right in the picture below. The blue flag iris are planted in an open weave basket and placed on a shelf in the pond. This picture is from the spring so you can see the pocket that the forget-me-nots are growing in.

View attachment 123791

This is the forget-me-nots now.

View attachment 123792
What are the tall rushy grassy things in the water and how are they planted?
 

j.w

I Love my Goldies
Joined
Feb 1, 2010
Messages
26,520
Reaction score
15,954
Location
Arlington, Washington
Hardiness Zone
USDA 8a
Country
United States
@Jkm Parrots Feather can be planted in a pot in your pond, that's how I have most of mine or you can tuck it in between your rocks so it's roots are in the water or just let it float. It need water for the roots or very constant wet soil.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
8,643
Reaction score
9,295
Location
Northern IL
The biggest tip for success is to make sure of the plant's preferred planting depth. Some marginals want to be in damp soil (cardinal flower for example) while others can be up to 10 or 12 inches deep (like lizard tail). Some start in the dirt on the edge of the pond and float on the water (like bog bean).

You have LOTS of great places in your pond for irises, reeds, and sedges between the rocks in just a few inches of water. Start them between the rocks and they will grow into the pond, creating their own root ball. Use rocks and gravel to prop up young plants until they start to take root. Once they establish themselves you'll forget how you even started them!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jkm

cas

Joined
Apr 20, 2015
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
2,043
Location
NE Ohio
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United States
What are the tall rushy grassy things in the water and how are they planted?
Those are blue flag iris. They are planted in kitty litter in an open weave basket like below

Plants - containers 1.jpg
 
Joined
Sep 14, 2018
Messages
456
Reaction score
85
Location
Georgia
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
I have a problem with plant depth. I do know that lilly's should be about 24" deep.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 12, 2009
Messages
880
Reaction score
500
Location
Mount Pocono, Pennsylvania
Hardiness Zone
6a
If your pond is too deep for lillies, you can use something like a milk crate to get the right height. Maybe tie the lily pot to the milk crate so it doesn't fall off.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top