Newbie to ponds


Jhn

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6"x6" would work with out bowing or putting in vertical posts, if you interlocked the corners correctly. Just built a pond that is around 1.5 to 2 ft above ground and 18" below ground and 7'w x 13' long with 6x6's above ground.

My biggest concern with wood is where it contacts the ground. If you don't get wood that is treated for ground contact, it will rot out in a few years no matter how it is built. Read the tag on the wood to see what treatment it is rated for.
 

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I know how to do footings and concrete it's just where I live I have no rear access to my garden and my missus wouldn't appreciate me carrying bags of cement through the house that's the only reason why I was thinking of a cleaner way without footings and foundations, might just stick with a raised bed and go to maybe 4ft high, only wanted it in the ground aswell as where I live gets very cold in the winter.

Sam
I'd think you'd have less worry if 2/3 were in ground and 1/3 above as far as shifting or "walking" is concerned and if it gets that cold the more in ground the better.

Part of the in ground section can simply be mounded raised ground from the excavation.
 
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I'd think you'd have less worry if 2/3 were in ground and 1/3 above as far as shifting or "walking" is concerned and if it gets that cold the more in ground the better.

Part of the in ground section can simply be mounded raised ground from the excavation.
this may be the best option.
 
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Jhn

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I'd think you'd have less worry if 2/3 were in ground and 1/3 above as far as shifting or "walking" is concerned and if it gets that cold the more in ground the better.

Part of the in ground section can simply be mounded raised ground from the excavation.
Mounding the extra dirt will work for insulating the pond as you mentioned, but wouldn't do much for the bowing of the wood. Compacting it may help abit, but if the wood is going to bow loose or recently compacted dirt isn't going to prevent it from bowing.
 
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j.w

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That is what I was thinking, more in the ground so there is your freezing problem fixed and less above so no worry about shifting.
 

IPA

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this may be the best option.
I used 8x4x16 cinder block stood on end, 6 inches buried 10 above ground but since I did a bad job leveling some are 12" above in the bog filter area and 4 above and dig down to 2 feet total, 8" below bottom of block in the pond area. As I was hauling all these blocks I couldn't help but think of @sissy 's thread where she must have hauled more than 5 times as many and chuckled a little. I don't know how much this can be scaled up and still have stability though.

IMG_0634.JPG
 
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What I think I'll be doing is make the frame as previously mentioned and on each corner there will be a cut down fence post and one In the middle of the 6/7ft length which will be put into the ground about 30/40cm and I'll use postmix to secure the posts, as mentioned previously by a member that's what they did I think it will work as I won't be going so high with the raised bed.
 

brokensword

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...and I think it's a better idea to have as much of the pond below ground simply because you benefit in the winter from the warmer earth. Perhaps dig down 2-3' and have the rest above ground? That would get you enough depth to help overwinter the fish. I'd dig as low as your frostline but it seems I've heard success stories from 2' and deeper. The more your pond is above ground, the more the air can cool/freeze your water.

Just my 2 cents.
 
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Hi guys,
I have rethinked my idea and come up with the following,

3ft below ground and 1ft above ground, fence posts in each corner and 2 on either side, buried 1 foot down concreted in and covering the rest in creosote, my work colleague said he wrapped some pond liner around the timber to stop the rot from setting in would this work ??, I want to avoid doing concrete like I said before as access to the garden is through the house.
 

Jhn

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Pond liner around the post is going to trap moisture, which will accelerate the rotting. Just get timbers that are rated for ground contact. You will be long gone before they rot.
 

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