schedule 40 non pressure, and cementing stone to vertical rubber liner


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I have a surplus of 2" schedule 40 yet it says non pressure on it. as long as its between the pump and the TPRs I should be able to use it? Just don't use it between a pump and a pressurized bead filter or between a pump and a sand gravel filter?

On a vertical wall that dives down into the pond I want the stone to go about 6" below water level with the pond liner in behind it. can a 4" lip to stack the rock 3 feet high be enough? it seems that even though cement supposedly sticks to pond liner that if/when the pond liner pulls away from the cinderblocks behind it that all the stone will fall into the pond. what keeps the back of the pond liner stuck to the cinderblocks? also what keeps ice from tearing apart the rockwork portion that is submerged?
 
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Meyer Jordan

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I have a surplus of 2" schedule 40 yet it says non pressure on it. as long as its between the pump and the TPRs I should be able to use it? Just don't use it between a pump and a pressurized bead filter or between a pump and a sand gravel filter?

PVC is typically used for plumbing. When it says non-pressure, it is referring to the pressures used in residential and commercial plumbing, usually anywhere from 30 psi to sometimes as high as 60 psi. A pond filter of any type will rarely exceed 10 psi or they fail. Is this thin-wall pvc? If so it will crack very easily if tangential stress is placed on it.
On a vertical wall that dives down into the pond I want the stone to go about 6" below water level with the pond liner in behind it. can a 4" lip to stack the rock 3 feet high be enough? it seems that even though cement supposedly sticks to pond liner that if/when the pond liner pulls away from the cinderblocks behind it that all the stone will fall into the pond. what keeps the back of the pond liner stuck to the cinderblocks? also what keeps ice from tearing apart the rockwork portion that is submerged?

Not quite sure what you are asking. If the liner is brought up behind this facing rock there is no reason for it to move. If you are attaching the liner to the face of concrete block then terminal strips would be utilized. As to how ice formation would affect the stability of the stacked rock, perhaps one of the Northern Forum members can address this. The only ice that I regularly encounter is the refrigerator ice-maker.
 
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Am I understanding that you want the only support for the rock facing to be the cement that holds it to the liner? Is there a shelf in the pond to support the rock?
 
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Mmathis

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Do you mean the shelf that you're placing rock on? I think I did mine about 10"-12" down from the top (I really don't remember....), and the shelf is about 10"-12" deep (actual horizontal space) Everyone does theirs different, but I wanted mine well below water level. I could be wrong, but I can't see a 4" shelf holding 3' of rock.....not enough horizontal space. But maybe I'm misinterpreting. Can you draw a diagram for us? I'm a visual person, so it's easier for me to grasp that way rather than with a written description.
 

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