String algae problem


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I've had this pond and the plants for many years. This year I have a huge problem with algae. I've pressure washed the pond and adjusting water before the fish go back in but how do I get rid of all thos string algae on my hardy water lollies?
Suggestions....
 

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Welcome to the GPF! How about telling us a bit more about your pond - how big, how many fish and what kind, what kind of filtration... any details you can share will be helpful.

And just a word about algae - doesn't matter what kind, it's all the same basically. It's out of control because you have an excessive amount of nutrients in your pond. Maybe too many fish, maybe they've outgrown the pond, maybe you have too much decaying organic material, maybe you're overfeeding the fish... whatever the cause may be, once you determine what it is and address it, the algae will go away all on its own.

And we hear all the time hear on the forum that "I've had this pond/these plants/these fish for many years and never had a problem". We think everything is the same, but in reality nature is always changing. Fish grow, plants grow, plants die... it's never static. And sometimes those changes create things that we consider undesirable, but in reality they are doing what nature intended them to do. That algae may be keeping your pond healthy for your fish.

And one last thing... I know you already did it, but power washing a pond is really not recommended. By doing so you remove the biofilm that is an essential part of the eco-system of your pond. Once a pond is established you really don't want to empty the pond and start fresh. "New pond syndrome" is what we call that.

Hope that helps. Oh, I guess I should answer your question about the plants! I would just pull as much off by hand as you can and drop them back in the pond. It's unsightly, but not harmful in any way. And as the pond achieves balance it will disappear on its own.
 
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I left plenty of bio :) the stream, waterfall basin, and skimmer box were all left untouched. Plus I choose not to repot my lillies at this time.
Only have nine 6 to 8 inch fish, some 3 yr old koi and some 10 year old goldfish.
Only thing different this year is a whole lot of baby fish. Lots my four, over 16 inch, koi last year so it's the first time fry have actually hatched. The pond restart was to get rid of so many young goldfish as well cut down on the string algae.
My filtration is a skimmer box to a waterfall and a stream bed to another waterfall into the pond.
No idea how many gallons because I built it with three different levels so fish could survive our harsh winters but also good depth for hardy water lillies.
It's approximately 9' x 12' with the far end being about 2 1/2' deep.
 

addy1

water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins
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Welcome to our group of pond lovers.

Just pick the string off. It might just come back.
 
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not my words but i came across this
The good news is that string algae is not necessarily bad for our pond, it is much more of a nuisance than a danger, and even has some benefits to it. Let’s talk about the good first. String algae can add a bit of habitat to your pond for baby fish, tadpoles, dragonfly nymph, snails, and other small pond critters. It can be a food source for many of the critters just listed, as well as adult fish. String algae has some filtration benefits and will actually remove nutrients from your water and help to improve water quality.
 
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I don't really mind it. I do a weekly "harvest" so it doesn't get out of controll in the summer, but the fish and frogs like it, and it looks pretty swaying in the currents, and it filters dirt and little bits of debris out of the water and keeps it crystal clear!
 
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