I don't know if I've introduced myself or not!

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by bagsmom, Jun 24, 2016.

  1. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Hi all! I'm in NW Ga. I've been wanting a pond for years!!!!! Just when I start to think I've saved about half the money I need, something comes up, like a vacation, or Christmas, or some other priority. I'm still dreaming... I have a pretty good idea of what I want to do, and I think the total cost for EVERYTHING, including plants and rocks and equipment, would be about $1200. We just got back from a vacation, so I'm back down to $0. By the time I save the money, I might be too old to dig the hole! In the meantime, I enjoy popping on here and learning from everyone!
     
    bagsmom, Jun 24, 2016
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  2. bagsmom

    peter hillman Let me think for minute....

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    Well you have now!:):). Ponds don't have to be expensive, the liner is most costly followed by the pump. Other accessories can be sourced cheaply, sometimes even free. Check your local craigslist for ponding stuff.
     
    peter hillman, Jun 25, 2016
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  3. bagsmom

    Big Lou

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    Welcome bagsmom!
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016
    Big Lou, Jun 25, 2016
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  4. bagsmom

    bettasngoldfish Maria

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    Welcome to the group!

    You can purchase stuff for the pond as you can afford it. It seems with ponds there will always be something you need or want. It never ends, but at least it's fun :)

    If you can't or don't want to dig a hole for the pond you can always do an above ground pond.
     
    bettasngoldfish, Jun 25, 2016
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  5. bagsmom

    ashirley Annie in SC

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    Our first pond was in a 700 gallon stock tank that we got from tractor supply for 100 because it didn't have a plug. We purchased one in the plumbing dept for a few bucks added a small pump and filter and we had a pond. We have since graduated to a 5000 gallon pond but i loved that first one.
     
    ashirley, Jun 25, 2016
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  6. bagsmom

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum! :)
     
    Becky, Jun 25, 2016
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  7. bagsmom

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Welcome to our group! Watch for sales at the end of the year you can find liners etc on sale.
     
    addy1, Jun 25, 2016
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  8. bagsmom

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    Hello and welcome!

    The initial outlay ($$) is the worst. Careful planning and educating yourself before you do get started can help a bunch! By knowing what you want to do as well as knowing your space and budget limitations, you can start making a few purchases here and there to get started.

    And yes, don't skimp on the liner -- probably the most expensive, but definitely the most important purchase!
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2016
    Mmathis, Jun 25, 2016
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  9. bagsmom

    haver79

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    Same here. Started with a 100 gal stock tank I buried in the ground. (trial run) I enjoyed it so graduated to a bigger pond. Small pond is better than no pond. :)
    Could always watch craigs list etc. The liner is the biggest expense as others have said but you don't want to skimp there.
     
    haver79, Jun 25, 2016
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  10. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Thanks everyone! Part of my financial quandry is that I have a very definite idea of what I want and I've priced it out, shopped around, etc. -- so I'm pretty sure it will cost what I think to get the pond of my dreams! I'm willing to wait! In the meantime, my neighbor has a very healthy little pond that's been there almost 20 years. She had major home reno stuff done, so power has been off and no filtration for about a year. The pond is so established and so healthy, it is self-maintaining. The little goldfish are super happy. I was up helping her with her yard (to earn money for my pond) and was sure I'd see a bunch of mosquito larvae. Not a one! She stopped feeding the fish a few years ago. They eat plants, algae, and bugs. It's very cool to see how a balanced ecosystem will flourish!

    So -- while I work, wait, read, and learn -- I can go visit her fishies!

    OH -- she may completely tear down and re-landscape her yard with a contemporary water feature. Guess who would get all her rocks and stuff!!!!!! ME! Nice ones with moss and lichen already growing on them!
     
    bagsmom, Jun 25, 2016
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  11. bagsmom

    MitchM

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    Be sure to factor in monthly electricity costs.(y)
     
    MitchM, Jun 25, 2016
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  12. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Here is a picture of the area the pond will be in. The yellow rope is just an idea of the outline, including rocks and edge plantings. The actual hole I dig will be a little smaller. I cut down a redbud and moved a giant forsythia bush. I want to use rocks from the property ( as well as some I will buy) and make a waterfall back against the stone wall. We have an outdoor electrical outlet on the corner of the house, and will plan to run it underground in conduit. Between the house and the pond, I'll take out the grass and do a pea gravel patio/beach. I hope I can start digging in the next several months, but as mentioned above, I have to save more $$$.
     

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    bagsmom, Jul 17, 2016
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  13. bagsmom

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    @bagsmom That looks like a nice spot and it sounds like your plans are well thought out. I can't wait to see it completed. Oh, and BTW, it is a membership requirement on this forum that you HAVE to take pictures as you go so we can all watch the progress [well, sorta just kidding -- it's not a requirement, but we really do love to see build-in-progress pics!].

    Didn't you say that you have clay soil? If so, you probably already know that there is a fine "window of opportunity" where the soil is actually perfect to dig [and that's somewhere between the liquid goo and concrete stages, LOL!]. Have you thought about what you will do with the dug-up soil as you go?

    And you have rocks on your property!!! Ponders love rocks! Lots of members here have access to rocks via their geographic location. Louisiana is NOT one of those locations -- I am so jealous!
     
    Mmathis, Jul 17, 2016
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  14. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    I have SOME rocks. Not enough -- but some! The walls that divide our lots are made of stones found in all the yards when the neighborhood was sort of terraced -- early 20th century. My neighbor across the street lives in their generations-old family home. Her grandfather had to carry the rocks to help with the walls when he was a boy! I love that story!
    Clay soil. Oh it's a booger! Here we don't have the pea soup stage. (Louisiana is a lot wetter.) It is either like artist's sculpting clay or concrete. The clay boulder things are horrible. When we bought our house, there was only one hydrangea bush. I dug out, tilled, amended, and planted a ton of flower beds. (Added 3,800 pounds of compost and topsoil.) PLUS dug a long dry creek bed that is the length of our long house. I am experienced in the evil ways of this soil and it scares me to death. It was hard doing all that digging 15 - 20 years ago. Eeeeek! I probably need to include a giant bottle of advil from Sam's Club in my pond budget! Somebody stop me before I hurt myself! LOL.
    I have friends who say I should make my kids and husband help me -- but I really have the urge to do this all by myself! (Except for the electrical.) It's a creative challenge!
     
    bagsmom, Jul 17, 2016
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  15. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Oh yeah -- what will I do with the soil? I have a few areas right next to the house that need to be built up to direct the gutter overflow runoff water away from the foundation. So I will put some of it there.
    The front yard runs slightly downhill away from the house, so I know I will need to build up the far side of the pond edge so it's level. I will also probably put some up near the waterfall -- just to built up the soil a bit there.
    If there is extra, we have the back half of our lot which is jungle-riffic. I can just toss it over the hill and let nature have it!
     
    bagsmom, Jul 17, 2016
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  16. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    I should do a "before pond digging" and "after pond digging" picture of my biceps.
     
    bagsmom, Jul 17, 2016
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  17. bagsmom

    Sarcasticshrub

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    You'd be surprised how much of that soil you will reuse during the building of your pond. Everything from building up a berm to raising the waterfall (you know you wan one) and back filling behind liner, and so on. I made the mistake of hauling all of the dirt from my dig to my pasture, just to haul quite a bit back later.

    Start collecting those lovely rocks, especially the big ones! You will save $$$ on purchasing them when you start to build. Driftwood will come in hand as well.
     
    Sarcasticshrub, Jul 18, 2016
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  18. bagsmom

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    I used every bit of excess soil and dug some up from the field. I did need to build a large dirt berm for the downhill side of my pond around 8 feet up.
    My pond in Arizona, flat land I used the soil to make texture to the yard around the pond, mounds, hills, stream bed etc.
     
    addy1, Jul 18, 2016
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