Best perennial pond plants for zone 7?

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plants' started by bagsmom, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Hi all!

    I am getting closer to having my first pond up and running. It is about 9 x 12, with a variety of shelves for various depths. I want a natural looking pond, so I plan to have it well-planted.

    I'm interested in submerged plants, marginals, etc. Are there some that are good planted in the gravel at the very edge, as well as in the soil outside the pond -- to sort of visually blend the inner area with the space outside the perimeter?

    If any of you have favorites, I'd love to hear which ones they are. Also good plants to plant around the waterfall hill and around the outer pond area.

    Thanks! I am so excited to get my pond going!
     
    bagsmom, Feb 12, 2017
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  2. bagsmom

    Lisak1

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    Most marginals will grow both inside and outside of the pond. In fact, you have to be careful with some of the more invasive ones or they will take over your yard! (I'm looking at you wort family!) Look for anything that's a ground cover and you'll find a good assortment. Check the growing habits - avoid things that are said to be "fast growing" or "spreading" unless you know what you're getting or have a big area to fill.

    My best advice to any gardener is to take a tour of your local area - just drive around and see what's growing. If you see it often that means it's a good grower in your area. If you don't know what it is, take a picture of it to your local garden center. Too many people fail at gardening because they are lured into the more exotic things they see at the nursery that are hard to grow or picky for the climate. Build your garden from the common, ordinary, hardy, and easy to grow and once you have a good base of plants you can try for some more unusual specimens later. Go on some garden tours in your area and talk to the gardeners - they are always happy to share their knowledge and maybe even a few plants!
     
    Lisak1, Feb 12, 2017
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  3. bagsmom

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    Good advice from @Lisak1! Creeping Jenny comes in three colour varieties, and fills your requirements quite well, as does Chameleon Plant (Houttuynia), but the latter may spread a bit TOO rapidly in your zone.
    John
     
    HARO, Feb 12, 2017
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  4. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    Believe me, I know about chameleon plant.
    My sister in law had some little pass along plants from a friend of hers. So pretty. Such nice leaves. I was happy to plant a few in my gardens. Who doesn't like free plants?!

    NOW it's like kudzu! I looked up what it was -- yep. Chameleon Plant. Grrrrrrr... It's everywhere now!
    Oh well. It IS pretty, anyway! :)
     
    bagsmom, Feb 12, 2017
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  5. bagsmom

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    Yup. It all depends on WHERE you plant it. That well-mannered, slow growing plant in a zone 5 yard could well be a real terror in a Florida pond. If you need proof, just Google "Water hyacinth"!
    John
     
    HARO, Feb 12, 2017
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  6. bagsmom

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    One I've grown to like a lot is

    BACOPA LEMON (BACOPA CAROLINIANA

    It can grow in or out of the water, and really looks nice when tucked into rocks (under water) and finds its way up the side of the pond. It functions a lot like Creeping Jenny and softens the transition from water to the side. So far I haven't had any issues where it became invasive -- just nice & tame. I think it gets to be a few inches tall, maybe.....? Plus, it smells nice!
    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
    Mmathis, Feb 12, 2017
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  7. bagsmom

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    I love Parrots Feather! It'll creep up out of your pond too w/it's roots in the water. I stick mine w/the roots crammed down in between the rocks around my pond. The roots must stay in water continuously.
    IMG_7591.JPG
     
    j.w, Feb 13, 2017
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  8. bagsmom

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    One of my favourite plants; and now I'm a criminal for harbouring it! :(:rolleyes:
    John
     
    HARO, Feb 13, 2017
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  9. bagsmom

    adavisus

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    Aquatic iris are a perk...
     

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    adavisus, Feb 13, 2017
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  10. bagsmom

    bagsmom

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    I have a bunch of narrow-leaved iris that my Dad always called Dutch Iris or Japanese Iris. They are not the big bearded kind. Much more delicate. I have a ton that need dividing. I wonder if they would do well in a pond? Or must they be a specific variety?
     
    bagsmom, Feb 13, 2017
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  11. bagsmom

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

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    Try them they may do wonderfully, you never know.
     
    addy1, Feb 13, 2017
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  12. bagsmom

    sissy sissy

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    I put ribbon grass in my pond after colleen talked about grasses and how well they do and they work great in my filters at cleaning the water and all I have to do is trim the roots once in awhile
     
    sissy, Feb 13, 2017
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  13. bagsmom

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    Forgot about the grasses @sissy I have one variegated sedge grass that I just love in my pond. On the left just beyond the gator. It's in a plastic pedestal pot on a shelf and I'm sure that pot is about ready to burst one of these days.

    IMG_6007.JPG
     
    j.w, Feb 13, 2017
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  14. bagsmom

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

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    Lovely! What is the white one with purple spots? Makes me think of Marsi Gras!
     
    Mmathis, Feb 13, 2017
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  15. bagsmom

    adavisus

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    Laevigata Colchesterii, it looks like some slightly crazy accountant has flicked blue pen ink on the petals....

    Very specific varieties are evolved to thrive with constantly wet roots, Dutch iris, off the top of my head are not. Ensata, Sibirica are reliable in an aquatic position. Rotting off in winter will happen to those iris which are not adapted to growing in a wet root position
     
    adavisus, Feb 13, 2017
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  16. bagsmom

    sissy sissy

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    Here water iris get out of hand and can eat up a liner if not careful .I pulled one out of a pond that I took out and thought I would use my truck to pull it out but as I did I started to pull the liner with it .I had to stop and take the fish out first and everything else and I ended up ruining part of the liner because of the iris .
     
    sissy, Feb 13, 2017
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  17. bagsmom

    HARO Pondcrastinator

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    The tall Yellow Flag Iris (pseudoacorus) will probably be banned here before long. It is currently considered a noxious weed, or something to that effect.
    John
     
    HARO, Feb 13, 2017
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  18. bagsmom

    sissy sissy

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    even the iris's i had in my gardens choked out other plants I had growing near them .I took out big chunks of tubers and moved them to areas where I get wash outs from heavy rains .Yellow ,purple ,black and different shades of blue ones had to be moved
     
    sissy, Feb 13, 2017
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  19. bagsmom

    j.w I Love my Goldies

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    The Yellow Flag is a pain here. I am trying to get rid of it all around my pond. I have to lift the heavy rocks around the pond edge to get the big tubers out and it is an ordeal. I got most but still have a few left.Those tubers get so large they lift the rocks and shove them into the pond. Maybe this Summer I'll take out the rest. No more Iris in between rocks ever again!
     
    j.w, Feb 14, 2017
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  20. bagsmom

    adavisus

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    The fast growing, fast spreading very large rhisome of yellow flag is well suited to stabilising the banks of big rivers where big floods are expected, this is how it is used in Europe along the banks of rivers where you want to protect property from powerful river erosion

    Other more ornamental iris choices grow something like 10-20 times smaller, take for example sibirica or ensata varieties, which grow dense and slow, those might take 10 years to fill out a bucket size pot, compared to yellow flag, which can fill several lakes in the same time scale

    On a 6" wide pot, its taken 10 years for this ensata to fill it with some 30 or so stems
     

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    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
    adavisus, Feb 14, 2017
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