DIY Pond Breather (Experiment)

Discussion in 'DIY - Do It Yourself' started by Stephen T., Oct 29, 2017.

  1. Stephen T.

    Stephen T.

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    pond breather1.jpg pond breather004.jpg I used things I had kicking around and came up with something to try this winter.

    I used a 3" pipe that's 32" long, half underwater and half above to, hopefully, keep it above the snow and below the ice. I had some blue foam 1" insulation and used 2 layers pressed on the pipe for floatation. To help keep the water column warm, I added some silvered bubble wrap around the pipe, 1 layer below water and 2 layers above, held on with plastic zip ties. Since I had a chunk of 3" foam pipe insulation, I cut it down to fit inside above the water level. I also added a styrofoam plug to the top of the pipe, with a 3/8" hole to let the gasses escape, while holding in some warmth. To keep snow out, there's an elbow pushed on top, that is removable to check and make sure things are working.

    So far, the ice on our pond has gotten about 10-12" thick, the bottom of the breather pipe is 16" down, with a weight (chunk of rebar) on the bottom to keep it down. I attached an airstone to the inside at the bottom. I'm hoping this will provide enough circulation of "warm" water to keep things clear of ice in this small space.
     
    Stephen T., Oct 29, 2017
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  2. Stephen T.

    audioenvy

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    Maybe I'm completely wrong but it seems like gasses in the water are going to rise from the bottom until they reach the ice where they get trapped. Since the opening of your breather is well below that point how will the gasses get into the hole?
     
    audioenvy, Oct 29, 2017
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  3. Stephen T.

    Stephen T.

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    I'm thinking that there will be enough circulation, the air rising on one side of the pipe will lift warmer water towards the surface and water will be dropping on the other side. I thought about putting a divider in most the way to the surface, but decided against it. The pond is actually 42" deep. I wanted it deep enough to always be below the ice, but not deep enough to massively disturb the warmest water on the bottom.

    As I said, this is an experiment. We shall see what happens. I did bring my favorite fish inside in a large aquarium.
     
    Stephen T., Oct 29, 2017
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  4. Stephen T.

    MitchM

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    You didn't ask for input, so I hope you don't mind if I make a suggestion.
    The hole that you have drilled in the styrofoam cap will pump out humid air, so I think it will eventually freeze over which will cause the main tube to fill with air, as long as any condensation in the airline doesn't freeze up first.
    - so check the hole in the cap periodically for ice blockage and clear as needed.
     
    MitchM, Oct 29, 2017
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  5. Stephen T.

    Stephen T.

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    I certainly don't mind suggestions! I planned on regularly pulling the cap to see what's going on inside anyway, so that is a good idea, which I will do.
     
    Stephen T., Oct 29, 2017
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