How to close my pond

Discussion in 'Winterizing Your Pond' started by GinoLicious, Aug 18, 2017.

  1. GinoLicious

    GinoLicious

    Joined:
    May 25, 2016
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    9
    I have a lot of Shubunkin/ Koi mix in my pond. One fish laid eggs and I have about 15 small guys no bigger than 4 inches long.

    Don't want to take them all out. I took my fish out last year for the winter. Rather not this year.

    What do I need to do?

    Do I need to run my filter and pump in the winter?

    Should I just let the pond freeze over and my guys will be fine?

    Pond is about 5 feet by 4 feet and about 1.5 feet deep.

    I ask now because my pond store as a huge sale one for the next few weeks so if I need a deicer or something I rather get it now on sale.
     
    GinoLicious, Aug 18, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. GinoLicious

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    Location:
    Arkansas
    NO, if it freezes completely over, they might die due to no gas exchange.

    Run the filter, and the pump. Have a defroster in the water (optional) Don't run the pump or filter if you have below freezing temps.
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 18, 2017
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. GinoLicious

    GinoLicious

    Joined:
    May 25, 2016
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    9
    Our winters out here go below freezing temperatures. So I do not want to run the pond equipment in those harsh temps.
     
    GinoLicious, Aug 18, 2017
    #3
  4. GinoLicious

    Tula

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2013
    Messages:
    3,643
    Likes Received:
    2,730
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    You'll need an open area of the pond, for gas exchange. There are several ways you can do this...pond de-icers, air stones and some of us use Pond Breathers.

    If you have frigid temps, you risk your filter and hoses / pipes, freezing, if you run them.
     
    Tula, Aug 18, 2017
    #4
  5. GinoLicious

    Angel

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2017
    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    700
    Location:
    SNJ
    need to keep and air hole vie water fall/spout to break up water to not freeze or a floating heater or a air bubbler.

    you need a hole in ice to keep the fish alive. figure out a by pass or pick up a pump and hose for winter uses. I have as a main a 3200gph pump as main, my winter pump in junction with floating heater is 1,200gph .

    for winter more or less set up is not important on looks. its function as snow willl cover your temp fix. Thats how i look at winter time temp fix as when its time to " open the pond" the equipment is stored for 9 months
     
    Angel, Aug 18, 2017
    #5
  6. GinoLicious

    GinoLicious

    Joined:
    May 25, 2016
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    9
    What would use the least amount of electricity? I always thought pond breathers never took any.
     
    GinoLicious, Aug 18, 2017
    #6
  7. GinoLicious

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    Location:
    Arkansas
    you dont need any of those things.
    You just need to break the ice with your hand, and if it refreezes within 3 days, break it again.
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 18, 2017
    #7
  8. GinoLicious

    Magzire

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2016
    Messages:
    288
    Likes Received:
    105
    Location:
    Kildare
    Winter talk already :)
     
    Magzire, Aug 18, 2017
    #8
    DutchMuch likes this.
  9. GinoLicious

    MitchM

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    6,314
    Likes Received:
    6,177
    Location:
    Water Valley, Alberta
    At 225 gallons, your pond is way too small for koi to start with.
    At 18 inches deep, unless you're covering the pond and going to either keep pumps running or provide some aeration, you need to bring the fish in.
     
    MitchM, Aug 18, 2017
    #9
  10. GinoLicious

    MitchM

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    6,314
    Likes Received:
    6,177
    Location:
    Water Valley, Alberta
    Says the guy from Arkansas....;)
    Our ice here gets too thick too fast to try that, plus I don't recommend breaking ice - it can startle and stress the fish.
     
    MitchM, Aug 18, 2017
    #10
    Tula and MoonShadows like this.
  11. GinoLicious

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    5,381
    Likes Received:
    5,884
    Location:
    Northern IL
    "you dont need any of those things.
    You just need to break the ice with your hand, and if it refreezes within 3 days, break it again."
    :ROFLMAO::LOL:o_O:ROFLMAO::LOL:
     
    Lisak1, Aug 18, 2017
    #11
  12. GinoLicious

    addy1 water gardener / gold fish and shubunkins Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2010
    Messages:
    32,306
    Likes Received:
    16,569
    Location:
    Frederick, Maryland
    I use a pond breather. Very little electricity used works great.

    To early for winter talk as we head to over 100 heat index again.
     
    addy1, Aug 18, 2017
    #12
  13. GinoLicious

    Lisak1

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2013
    Messages:
    5,381
    Likes Received:
    5,884
    Location:
    Northern IL
    There is not one correct answer to this question. Some ponds can be run all winter. Some ponds need to be shut down. The correct answer for any pond depends entirely on how your pond is constructed. Some fish can stay out all winter - even in a pond that is shut down - some need to be brought inside. Depth is obviously important - but only as it applies to your climate. (And the same goes for heat - a pond in the hotter climates needs to be deeper to keep fish cool when temperatures get high.) Total pond volume and fish load also come into the equation.

    Whether or not your pond CAN run all winter also depends on construction - how deep is your plumbing? How is your waterfall constructed? Can it handle icing over without causing all your water to be re-directed out of the pond?

    We run our pond all winter long. We're in zone 5B near Chicago, so you may be familiar with the winters we have. We do not have a visible "hole" in our pond for much of the winter, but we do have a waterfall which is constantly flowing which allows for gas exchange. Our plumbing is deep enough to keep it from freezing and our waterfall is wide enough to keep ice dams from forming and emptying the pond. Our pump is submerged, so there's no concern about it being exposed to the cold. All things that are important when deciding how to handle your pond over winter.

    On a side note: @DutchMuch - I would suggest you not give advice about things you have not experienced. It's not helpful. This comment "Run the filter, and the pump. Have a defroster in the water (optional) Don't run the pump or filter if you have below freezing temps" tells me you've never experienced winter. You say "run the pump" then - "don't run the pump". Have a defroster (whatever the heck that is) but you don't need it. You're just confusing the issue. And this:

    That's just crazy talk. In a cold climate, a pond can freeze so fast OVERNIGHT that you'd never be able to break the ice with your hand. And in three days? You'd be able to walk on water at that point. If you lived where it got cold you'd understand why you aren't going to be turning your pond on and off depending on the temperature. The last thing you want to do when it's frigid is to be outside fooling with your pond. And since when is it ever good advice to turn a pond on and off repeatedly? Our temperatures can fluctuate from freezing to above freezing to freezing again in a matter of hours - you'd make yourself crazy. Stick to what you know is my advice to you.
     
    Lisak1, Aug 18, 2017
    #13
    moose, MommaHuffman and haver79 like this.
  14. GinoLicious

    Nyboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2017
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    391
    Location:
    White Plains
    Newbie from the North, what is a pond breather ?
     
    Nyboy, Aug 18, 2017
    #14
  15. GinoLicious

    cas

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2015
    Messages:
    1,352
    Likes Received:
    1,759
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Here is a thread on the pond breather:
    https://www.gardenpondforum.com/threads/pond-breather.15976/

    Some notes about the pond breather:
    Pulls water to the surface and exchanges it with freshly oxygenated water. Creates a gentle current to move oxygen throughout the pond.
    The black tube inside the glass tube is a 25 watt heating strip that helps prevent the clear tube from freezing up.
    Low flow pump (145 GPH) uses 40 watts.
    Protects at ice depths up to 15 inches.
    Reliable performance range from minus 10°F to minus 20°F.
    Safe from power interruptions - thaws itself and restarts in a very short time after a power outage.
    The breather will freeze solid in the pond, but in the tube you can see a trickle of water going up the tube and back down the tube, and you can hear a slight trickle sound like a fountain.
    A pond breather allows for a solid ice cover, so no evaporation, but maintains a healthy level of aeration.
    The pump sits 30” deep and is incased in a round cage.

    Here is a picture of @MitchM 's pond breathers during the winter in Canada.
    winter - pond breather (2).jpg
     
    cas, Aug 18, 2017
    #15
    DutchMuch and Nyboy like this.
  16. GinoLicious

    Nyboy

    Joined:
    May 10, 2017
    Messages:
    474
    Likes Received:
    391
    Location:
    White Plains
    Thanks @cas sounds like just what I need for a fountain putting in at weekend home. I like that it is safe with power interruptions.
     
    Nyboy, Aug 18, 2017
    #16
    cas likes this.
  17. GinoLicious

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I kind of did "know" that, that's why I gave it.
    Harsh reply.
    Sorry if "on and off" confused you I know its hard to understand fully...
    Temps don't drop from sixty to thirty two in a half hour, its not flicking a light switch up and down.
    If you don't like my advice don't take it, btw this was my experience. Idk if you know but I have had 3 ponds before and am making one now.

    I didn't know you can turn a pond off and on. Cool!
    But if you mean a filter & pump, its a quite common practice... No it doesn't damage any mechanical equiptment either. (unless you just keep flickering it which is not a good thing to do)

    it gets negative 10 where I live.... Stick to what you know.


    If you don't like the manual labor use a defroster that is used for cattle, cheap and works.


    Shoot I come back to the forum after 4 days of vacation and BAM get hit hard already. Way the world turns I guess, to many pricks to worry about one. How do you know what I experience and what I don't? I don't claim these things to you?
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2017
    DutchMuch, Aug 18, 2017
    #17
  18. GinoLicious

    DutchMuch Lord Of The Aquascapes!

    Joined:
    May 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    Location:
    Arkansas
    use a knife, or a spud bar. Its less "noisy" to the fish.
    Personally I just carved a circle with a knife (by carve a circle, I mean stab the ice in a circular shape) then pushed it down with my hand
     
    DutchMuch, Aug 18, 2017
    #18
  19. GinoLicious

    Mmathis TurtleMommy

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    8,909
    Likes Received:
    4,858
    Location:
    NW Louisiana -- zone 8b
    I was thinking the same thing(s). At 18" deep, it's very likely to freeze solid. If that happens, I seriously doubt that a Pond Breather would help -- it's designed to keep a hole open for gas exchange, but NOT for keeping a pond from freezing.

    I say, take the fish inside one more time and........ (see next sentence)

    I know I this doesn't address your current question/situation, but maybe this winter would be a good time to consider and plan for construction of a larger, deeper pond. Most of us do spend our winters planning and dreaming.
     
    Mmathis, Aug 18, 2017
    #19
    DutchMuch likes this.
  20. GinoLicious

    MitchM

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    6,314
    Likes Received:
    6,177
    Location:
    Water Valley, Alberta
    No, sorry, it's not.
    It's much louder than, for example, tapping on the glass to fish in an aquarium.
    The noise is still going to stress the fish.
    In addition, a passive open water area may or may not provide sufficient gas exchange to ensure survivable conditions for the fish. By a passive open water area, I mean a simple opening in the ice with no water circulation.
    A lot also depends on how much organic matter is present that will decay over the period of time that you have ice cover, and of course the size of the open water area relative to the pond size.
     
    MitchM, Aug 18, 2017
    #20
    Mmathis likes this.
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.