Filter Issues.


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You got the basics.
No filter after the bog. As mentioned, if you did add a filter and it clogged, your water would be backing up and overflowing out of the bog.

If you decide to drill any holes in the "tub", I would advise the use of a bulkhead fitting for a perfect seal. I think I mentioned that before.

There are a couple ways you can build your under gravel manifold pipe. You can drill holes or cut slits in your manifold pipe. If you cut slits, cut them 1/3 through the PVC pipe. I spaced mine 1-1/2 inches apart. I have two manifold pipes each is around 10 feet long. Since your setup is much smaller, you might want them spaced closer.

You can face the holes (or slits) up or down. It seems to be a matter of opinion on that choice. I faced mine up, figuring they might get blocked if any sediment collected on the bottom.

I have a clean-out stack at the end of each manifold pipe. (I have two manifold pipes). The end of the pipes have a 90 degree fitting facing up. The pipes end just above the surface of the gravel. I have a screw cap on each one.
If the water returning to the pond slows down, I'll turn off the pump, unscrew the cap, turn the pump back on and watch black water shoot out for a few seconds. (I shoot it into a nearby flower bed). This forces out anything that may have collected inside the manifold pipe. After that, the water runs full force.

I keep a rope tied to my pump for easy removal and to keep it off the bottom. This prevents the pump from picking up heavy debris that has settled on the bottom. I use a net to scoop that stuff out.

Oh, the water traveling through your bog should be relatively slow for best filtration.
Once again, many thanks for your help poconojoe and everyone else who has been so helpful to me. Brian M.
 
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cut slits
As more and more manufactures are going to thin kerf sicular saw blades thats a pretty thin cut . I'd double cut or place the cuts closer together
 
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The plumbing can either enter at the bottom of the box (you'd probably need some sort of bulkhead fitting) or, an easier method, use a 90 degree elbow and drop it down the inside of the box to the bottom.
Dear Lisak 1, One thing I need some advice on - so, the water pumped from the pond enters the bog filter and is taken to the bottom through a pipe. I understand that bit but does the pipe carrying this water (and leaking it steadily through holes or slits into the gravel) have to be in a particular pattern, ie is it like a snake, albeit one with right angled joints or do a number of smaller pipes run off a central pipe and are capped at the ends. I hope I'm making myself clear. Regards, Brian M. ps I've just seen a video by the pond digger who shows how he builds the plumbing for his bog filter - he uses a big central pipe and slightly smaller pipes bracketed to that and slots and holes are drilled and cut in the pipes and brackets and caps as necessary. So I think I know the answer to my own question.
 
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There's no right or wrong answer just answers on which might work a little better then others. The slits are the option i like best but i prefer a solid 1/8" cut 6 inches apart . with the slits facing downward. i would go as far as slipping a little rubber under these slits so it a piece of gravel is vibrated by the current it's not working on the liner but on a piece of scrap. The other way i'd look at it is the force of the water will once the bog begins to get used the pressure will build and change in the pipe so i believe the slits don't need to vary too much i could be wrong im not an engineer but as the debris breaks down in the bog the pressures will change and work on the next least are or resistance.
 
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Size of manifold pipe and how many branches depends on the size of the bog. You may only need one straight pipe if your bog is small.

My bog is about 14 feet by 6 feet and I branched out with two 10 foot long pipes. I used a wye fitting instead of a Tee to branch off. I figured there would be less resistance with a wye.

I used 2 inch pvc pipe and cut the slits with a sawzall (reciprocating saw). My slits are 1/3 through the pipes and 1-1/2 inches apart. If I had to do it again, I'd use something with a little thicker blade.
 
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sick of this laptop changing what I want to say. Going to attempt to upgrade from Windows 7. If It doesn't work, new laptop for Christmas
 
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There's no right or wrong answer just answers on which might work a little better then others. The slits are the option i like best but i prefer a solid 1/8" cut 6 inches apart . with the slits facing downward. i would go as far as slipping a little rubber under these slits so it a piece of gravel is vibrated by the current it's not working on the liner but on a piece of scrap. The other way i'd look at it is the force of the water will once the bog begins to get used the pressure will build and change in the pipe so i believe the slits don't need to vary too much i could be wrong im not an engineer but as the debris breaks down in the bog the pressures will change and work on the next least are or resistance.
Many thanks, mrsclem, I'm gradually understanding the principle as I get more info. All the best, Brian
 
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There's no right or wrong answer just answers on which might work a little better then others. The slits are the option i like best but i prefer a solid 1/8" cut 6 inches apart . with the slits facing downward. i would go as far as slipping a little rubber under these slits so it a piece of gravel is vibrated by the current it's not working on the liner but on a piece of scrap. The other way i'd look at it is the force of the water will once the bog begins to get used the pressure will build and change in the pipe so i believe the slits don't need to vary too much i could be wrong im not an engineer but as the debris breaks down in the bog the pressures will change and work on the next least are or resistance.
Slits sound best to me too, many thanks, Brian
 
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There's no right or wrong answer just answers on which might work a little better then others. The slits are the option i like best but i prefer a solid 1/8" cut 6 inches apart . with the slits facing downward. i would go as far as slipping a little rubber under these slits so it a piece of gravel is vibrated by the current it's not working on the liner but on a piece of scrap. The other way i'd look at it is the force of the water will once the bog begins to get used the pressure will build and change in the pipe so i believe the slits don't need to vary too much i could be wrong im not an engineer but as the debris breaks down in the bog the pressures will change and work on the next least are or resistance.
Size of manifold pipe and how many branches depends on the size of the bog. You may only need one straight pipe if your bog is small.

My bog is about 14 feet by 6 feet and I branched out with two 10 foot long pipes. I used a wye fitting instead of a Tee to branch off. I figured there would be less resistance with a wye.

I used 2 inch pvc pipe and cut the slits with a sawzall (reciprocating saw). My slits are 1/3 through the pipes and 1-1/2 inches apart. If I had to do it again, I'd use something with a little thicker blade.
A Y fitting sounds sensible. Your suggestion of the size of the slits is greatly appreciated. Thanks again, Brian M.
 
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I have a planter box bog for my 100 gallon guppy indoor pond. I used several sheet of plastic liner, and lots of improvised fixes to get it set up right for my pond. I don’t know how to add a link to my indoor pond thread, but I believe it is in the diy area. I used a box that is probably too shallow, but it’s working. In it, I have pothos, an elephant ear in soil in a plastic planter that wicks up water, and various other plants I can’t think of just now, and I just added a baby java fern to see if that will grow well. My water is good, still clear, with 100+ well fed guppies, and a few submerged plants. This has been going strong around a month now, and I need to pull my pre filter for a good cleaning tonight. I used a pump that I think moves 115 gallons per hour, with 1/2 the flow just freely circulated and half feeding the bog. The “ pipe” I used was a length of garden hose, with slits cut in it until the water would flow well. My cats think this is their dog free, fish flavored water source, so I also need to top it off!
 
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I have a planter box bog for my 100 gallon guppy indoor pond. I used several sheet of plastic liner, and lots of improvised fixes to get it set up right for my pond. I don’t know how to add a link to my indoor pond thread, but I believe it is in the diy area. I used a box that is probably too shallow, but it’s working. In it, I have pothos, an elephant ear in soil in a plastic planter that wicks up water, and various other plants I can’t think of just now, and I just added a baby java fern to see if that will grow well. My water is good, still clear, with 100+ well fed guppies, and a few submerged plants. This has been going strong around a month now, and I need to pull my pre filter for a good cleaning tonight. I used a pump that I think moves 115 gallons per hour, with 1/2 the flow just freely circulated and half feeding the bog. The “ pipe” I used was a length of garden hose, with slits cut in it until the water would flow well. My cats think this is their dog free, fish flavored water source, so I also need to top it off!
Hi Jamie, Many thanks for your description of your bog filter set up. I notice that your pond is around the same size as mine so I wondered if you could give me the dimensions. (I'll check the DIY thread to see if it's there). As my pond is too small for my four giant goldfish, my bog filter would need to be bigger but it would be handy to have a rough idea of the size I'll need. My pond being outside has the disadvantage of temperatures too low to suit Pothos (though I have some growing in small pond baskets at the moment) so I'll need to make sure that my plants are hardy. London doesn't get that cold but from time to time we do have frosts and freezing weather. Many thanks for your advice. Brian M.
 
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Bogs are preferable at 30% of the surface area of the pond, which could be done by T-ing off the pipe and having multiple bog boxes, or larger ones. Any water proof container that is fish safe could be modified to be a bog, in my case I made a wooden planter box usable by lining it with plastic.i created a “fall lip” by cutting out a low spot, then attached a lip of plastic I made out of a plastic jug, and then because my husband said it was too loud, attached nylon string where the water was falling so the water would cling to that and be more silent. I’ll admit, this is an “army engineering special” where I made what I needed with what I had on hand. The only things I bought were a new liner as my other one developed a leak, a single sheet of plywood to prevent cats from clawing the liner, paint, stain, and plants and gravel. It’s not the prettiest thing, but it gets the job done.
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My pond is 2 ft by 3 ft, if I recall correctly, so 30% of 6 ft is roughly 2 ft, I really do need a wider bog box, but it’s what I had on hand, and despite being about half as wide as I need, it’s doing the job. I plan to work on that tonight, or tomorrow, depending on how my headache goes. I’ve got this and the next night off from work, so I try to do fishy maintenance on these days. But I’ve also got a list of things I want/ need to get done, such as cleaning and rearranging my cupboards.
 
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I looked up my thread, “very basic indoor pond” under pond construction and equipment.
 
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My pond is 2 ft by 3 ft, if I recall correctly, so 30% of 6 ft is roughly 2 ft, I really do need a wider bog box, but it’s what I had on hand, and despite being about half as wide as I need, it’s doing the job. I plan to work on that tonight, or tomorrow, depending on how my headache goes. I’ve got this and the next night off from work, so I try to do fishy maintenance on these days. But I’ve also got a list of things I want/ need to get done, such as cleaning and rearranging my cupboards.
Many thanks Jamie. Brian M
 
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Many thanks for all the advice but there is a question that I need help with. I've read that the water that goes from the pond into the bog filter should not go through another filter first as this will mean that the water reaching the bog plants will be denuded of nutrients. Here is my query - as my 400 litre pond is overcrowded and I have to do such big water changes every week, it occurred to that it would make sense to leave the original filter pump in the pond and as it has a handy tap / diverter which I could use to pump the water into the "back end " of my bog filter. The water in the pond gets up to around 20 part per million Nitrate wise in one week - so why not run this water through the bog filter instead of doing a water change. So water enters the bog filter at 20ppm feeds the plants and comes out nitrate free. The fish continue to eat poo and piss and this nitrated water will in turn be pumped into the bog filter. My current filter doesn't remove nitrates anyway so why not leave it in place to catch the debris, provide a habitat for the beneficial bacteria who live in the ceramic media and turn the ammonia into nitrites and then nitrates i.e plant food. Does this make sense? Please advise. Thanks again, Brian Montague.
 
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