Shallow reflection pool / pond advice


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Hi all,

I'm new to this forum - and new to the pond world also!

I've recently just installed a shallow reflection pool - it is about 30cm / 12 inches deep and about 5m x 3m (16ft x 10ft)
I have installed a much deeper sump section (1m x 1m) to house a pump with a UV filter that is on constant.

on the wall above this pond, I have a live wall consisting of loads of potted plants - and it has an irrigation system that feeds tap water to the potholders. Subsequently, the overflow that trickles through to the bottom keeps the pond topped up as it comes on every day for 5 / 10 minutes.

I have a few questions if someone here could help me!

I had planned on putting in prob 6 - 8 goldfish into the pond

can you see it being a problem if I am topping up the pond with overflow water from the irrigation system every day as it is untreated tap water?
I've checked the water report here for my area and there is no chloramine in it, chlorine levels are 0.74mg/L free residual

and my other question is that I got myself a pond vac and cleaned out all of the silt in the pond, to get back to the black fibreglass liner.
I want to put in some black polished pebbles for the bottom, but I do not want them all to turn green with algae. I've noticed on a sunny day, that the pond can begin to grow a green tint on the bottom and edges.
Is there a way to prevent this from happening, or will I have to just accept that if I want to have fish in there.
My other option, I am guessing, is to skip the fish part, and put in some chlorine to keep the algae from growing entirely.

thanks :)
 
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Hi all,

I'm new to this forum - and new to the pond world also!

I've recently just installed a shallow reflection pool - it is about 30cm / 12 inches deep and about 5m x 3m (16ft x 10ft)
I have installed a much deeper sump section (1m x 1m) to house a pump with a UV filter that is on constant.

on the wall above this pond, I have a live wall consisting of loads of potted plants - and it has an irrigation system that feeds tap water to the potholders. Subsequently, the overflow that trickles through to the bottom keeps the pond topped up as it comes on every day for 5 / 10 minutes.

I have a few questions if someone here could help me!

I had planned on putting in prob 6 - 8 goldfish into the pond

can you see it being a problem if I am topping up the pond with overflow water from the irrigation system every day as it is untreated tap water?
I've checked the water report here for my area and there is no chloramine in it, chlorine levels are 0.74mg/L free residual

and my other question is that I got myself a pond vac and cleaned out all of the silt in the pond, to get back to the black fibreglass liner.
I want to put in some black polished pebbles for the bottom, but I do not want them all to turn green with algae. I've noticed on a sunny day, that the pond can begin to grow a green tint on the bottom and edges.
Is there a way to prevent this from happening, or will I have to just accept that if I want to have fish in there.
My other option, I am guessing, is to skip the fish part, and put in some chlorine to keep the algae from growing entirely.

thanks :)
CHLORINE WILL KILL YOUR PLANTS
BUT YOU CAN HAVE TWO OUT OF THREE, water your wall with the tap water let it drain into the reflecting pond. add salt to the reflecting pond to keep the rocks and water free of algae
 
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CHLORINE WILL KILL YOUR PLANTS
BUT YOU CAN HAVE TWO OUT OF THREE, water your wall with the tap water let it drain into the reflecting pond. add salt to the reflecting pond to keep the rocks and water free of algae

Do you mean the chlorine will kill my fish? I haven’t ever heard of killing plants / flowers by watering them with tap water.

Presumably, after I add salt to the water it’s no longer suitable for goldfish?
If that's the case, how much salt are we talking to keep the algae away?

I could insert a chlorine filter inline with the water timer on the wall without too much problem i expect if that is a solution to any of these ?
 
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Do you mean the chlorine will kill my fish? I haven’t ever heard of killing plants / flowers by watering them with tap water.
To get to the point your black rocks don't have algae on them
 
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The advantage to satisfying once it's added it is not effected by the sun and bleaching it away. Water evaporates the salt stays . Chlorine you need to constantly keep adding
 
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The advantage to satisfying once it's added it is not effected by the sun and bleaching it away. Water evaporates the salt stays . Chlorine you need to constantly keep adding
ah good point

is it possible to have enough salt in the water to kill the algae but still be hospitable for goldfish?
 
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Welcome to the GPF!

Here's a few issues that I see:

1. 12 inch deep water could get overheated for fish. Is there any shade? Or is this pool in full sun?

2. That green coating is natural to a pond. If you want a surface free of any kind of biofilm, you're really wanting a pool, not a pond.

3. The water dripping from the pots will be full of organic matter, that in itself will keep your pond teeming with microscopic life.

If it's a clear, clean pool that you're after, skip the fish and go ahead and treat the water with algaecide to keep it clear.

I'd love to see a picture of what you've created!
 
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They can take minimal amounts I'm not a goldfish guy . But if I fish can survive I'd i.agine do will some sort of algae
 
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Welcome to the GPF!

Here's a few issues that I see:

1. 12 inch deep water could get overheated for fish. Is there any shade? Or is this pool in full sun?

2. That green coating is natural to a pond. If you want a surface free of any kind of biofilm, you're really wanting a pool, not a pond.

3. The water dripping from the pots will be full of organic matter, that in itself will keep your pond teeming with microscopic life.

If it's a clear, clean pool that you're after, skip the fish and go ahead and treat the water with algaecide to keep it clear.

I'd love to see a picture of what you've created!
the pool is in partial shade, and I'm in northern Ireland so it's not really very warm here.

re: the plants yes - you are right, the compost will be coming through that water... will this be encouraging algae growth?
If so, I could set the timer on that water that it only waters the plants and no more.
i could Tee it off and have the pond top up with just direct water feed - but again - is it ok to do this or am I needing to treat this 5 mins of water into the pool for chlorine?

Ideally i'd like the stones and the sides to be relatively clear of algae and fish to be in there.
What I don't want is to put the stones in and then the whole bottom turn thick green and I'm left with a huge job of cleaning the stones.
 
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Welcome to the GPF!

Here's a few issues that I see:

1. 12 inch deep water could get overheated for fish. Is there any shade? Or is this pool in full sun?

2. That green coating is natural to a pond. If you want a surface free of any kind of biofilm, you're really wanting a pool, not a pond.

3. The water dripping from the pots will be full of organic matter, that in itself will keep your pond teeming with microscopic life.

If it's a clear, clean pool that you're after, skip the fish and go ahead and treat the water with algaecide to keep it clear.

I'd love to see a picture of what you've created!
the pool is in partial shade, and I'm in northern Ireland so it's not really very warm here.

re: the plants yes - you are right, the compost will be coming through that water... will this be encouraging algae growth?
If so, I could set the timer on that water that it only waters the plants and no more.
i could Tee it off and have the pond top up with just direct water feed - but again - is it ok to do this or am I needing to treat this 5 mins of water into the pool for chlorine?

Ideally i'd like the stones and the sides to be relatively clear of algae and fish to be in there.
What I don't want is to put the stones in and then the whole bottom turn thick green and I'm left with a huge job of cleaning the stones.
 

j.w

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1654096448162.gif
@bobpies
Nutrients from the compost, the fish and any sun are gonna create algae on the sides and rocks and sometimes floating in your water. Not sure how much chlorine fish can handle. You can't stop algae on the sides and rocks w/o using chemicals and those will hurt the fish. So if the amount of chlorine isn't enough to hurt the fish then it won't be enough to kill the algae either I would think. Mother nature is gonna do what she wants to your pond and we all live w/green rocks and sides which is actually a good thing for the life in your pond. And if you decide you need to scrub and clean and empty the pond all the time that is not good for the fish either and can kill them. Look at ponds in nature, they are not un-green, they have algae in them.
Algae can be our friends, just like spiders
1654097008985.gif
 
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Not only will the shallow water heat up in the sun, but it will get very cold in winter. There is not much room for the fish to escape freezing temperatures and ice at the top of the pond.

To me, this just doesn't seem suitable for fish.
 
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Hello and welcome!

Salt isn’t good for plants. I would love to see pics, as well. It sounds interesting.
The order was to water the plants and let that water drip into the salt reflecting pool not use salt water to water plants unless you have man groves
 
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Not only will the shallow water heat up in the sun, but it will get very cold in winter. There is not much room for the fish to escape freezing temperatures and ice at the top of the pond.

To me, this just doesn't seem suitable for fish.
There’s a 1m x 1m x 1m sump there that they can get into in the winter etc

It’s 1m deeper infact so - about 1.2m depth - that be ok for them to dip in and out of ?

I thought this would be adequate
 
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