Sitting by my pond wondering how many fish can I have?


Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
73
Reaction score
53
Location
Louisiana, near new orleans
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
I know the calculation of 1 inch of fish per gallon. But what only you more experienced ponders may know, is how quickly my 2 shubunkin gold fish, 6 comets will multiple? I would really like two more of the shubunkin. My pond is small really only about 9x5, 24 to 36 inches deep. So would it be ok, or will I wish I hadn't in a few months? Oh and I have a small lava rock/waterfall filtration that I don't want to stress, as my water is clear to the bottom.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Meyer Jordan

Tadpole
Joined
Oct 10, 2014
Messages
7,177
Reaction score
5,665
Location
Pensacola, Florida
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
They will multiply quite rapidly. Would not suggest adding any more fish.
A clarification--the inch to gallon method is not at all accurate. In fact neither length or pond capacity enters into the determining of fish load. Total fish mass to total available bioconversion is the proper and accurate method.
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2011
Messages
1,295
Reaction score
786
Location
carolinas
Hardiness Zone
8a
The calculation to do is how well do your fish cope when oxygen levels are low in the heat of summer

Assume you will have power failures, as the crumbling infrastructure becomes more stressed by global warming

4_9_14_Alyson_PowerOutagesSummaryGraphic_1050_685_s_c1_c_cclimatecentral.org.gif
 
Joined
Dec 21, 2015
Messages
1,302
Reaction score
693
Location
Hershey, PA
Showcase(s):
2
Hardiness Zone
6A
Country
United States
I calculate you to have 841 gallons. If you go over 20 goldfish, you'll need a bog and a decent filter.

IMO you can add 2 more now without an issue but you'll get green water if they spawn.
 

JBtheExplorer

Native Gardener
Joined
Apr 2, 2013
Messages
4,785
Reaction score
8,665
Location
Wisconsin
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
how quickly my 2 shubunkin gold fish, 6 comets will multiple?


On average, I get about 4-6 new baby fish that survive each year. In the past two seasons, I've gained 10 new fish from them breeding. Some forum members get considerably more. Soon, you'll have more fish than you ever wanted.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
May 26, 2014
Messages
973
Reaction score
492
Hardiness Zone
13b
once they start spawning , at least 30 fishes will b added yearly , depends on food u give and spawning places in pond .
i rem 1st time i had 2 shubs in separate pond with 1 koi and in only one spawn 35 fry survived then i added more koi , 4 ot 5 survive each spawn and they can spawn every 2 month
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
73
Reaction score
53
Location
Louisiana, near new orleans
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
once they start spawning , at least 30 fishes will b added yearly , depends on food u give and spawning places in pond .
i rem 1st time i had 2 shubs in separate pond with 1 koi and in only one spawn 35 fry survived then i added more koi , 4 ot 5 survive each spawn and they can spawn every 2 month
A koi would keep the fry in line. But my pond is just too small. I hope they don't produce that fast.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 11, 2012
Messages
7,046
Reaction score
7,230
Location
Water Valley, Alberta
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
2a
Country
Canada
Work through the calculations in my signature below - How many fish can your pond handle?
We can help you with the calculations if you like.
 
Joined
Nov 11, 2010
Messages
3,901
Reaction score
3,677
Location
Chicago Area
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Hi Ouida. One inch per gallon is really high. I think you are thinking one inch per sq foot of surface area. Another axom is 1 inch per either 10 gallons or 20 gallons. Experienced ponders on the forum will laugh at these axioms, but these can be a helpful guide when starting out. My last pond was 80 sq ft and I always strived to keep my bioload under 80 inches. Of course this was for moderate size fish 3-5 inches with moderate filstration. My strategy backfired because the fish load multiplied 10 fold with babies however they are all fine and basically it never exceeded the 1 inch per sq ft.. The best idea is to start with less fish than you think the pond will hold and then see how it goes. Otherwise you will spend all your time on the sickness and disease pages of this forum.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2013
Messages
11,536
Reaction score
11,628
Location
Northern IL
Showcase(s):
1
That "inch/gallon" thing must be an old aquarium idea because my husband repeated that like a mantra when we first started with our pond and he was an aquarium keeper as a teenager.

The place where we purchased our koi told us 1000 gallons for your first koi and then the "inch of fish per square foot of surface area" rule kicks in.
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
73
Reaction score
53
Location
Louisiana, near new orleans
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
Hi Ouida. One inch per gallon is really high. I think you are thinking one inch per sq foot of surface area. Another axom is 1 inch per either 10 gallons or 20 gallons. Experienced ponders on the forum will laugh at these axioms, but these can be a helpful guide when starting out. My last pond was 80 sq ft and I always strived to keep my bioload under 80 inches. Of course this was for moderate size fish 3-5 inches with moderate filstration. My strategy backfired because the fish load multiplied 10 fold with babies however they are all fine and basically it never exceeded the 1 inch per sq ft.. The best idea is to start with less fish than you think the pond will hold and then see how it goes. Otherwise you will spend all your time on the sickness and disease pages of this forum.
Yep, i
Hi Ouida. One inch per gallon is really high. I think you are thinking one inch per sq foot of surface area. Another axom is 1 inch per either 10 gallons or 20 gallons. Experienced ponders on the forum will laugh at these axioms, but these can be a helpful guide when starting out. My last pond was 80 sq ft and I always strived to keep my bioload under 80 inches. Of course this was for moderate size fish 3-5 inches with moderate filstration. My strategy backfired because the fish load multiplied 10 fold with babies however they are all fine and basically it never exceeded the 1 inch per sq ft.. The best idea is to start with less fish than you think the pond will hold and then see how it goes. Otherwise you will spend all your time on the sickness and disease pages of this forum.
Just saw your post. Yes the inch per gallon is what I know from my aquarium years, and I don't follow it, under stocked and over filtered is always best. I got 10 fish total, and that's probably 6 too many. Considering the pondS small filter. I do have a 55 gallon drum that if needed, I'll figure how to add it on. To be honest I knew it was too many, but we put in 4 and there was nothing to look at, then 4 more, and then 2 more, lol. I did say, I'll regret this later. Especially after reading on this thread how much they repopulate. I somehow figured my aquarium fish reproduce, but only live if I see them and get them out, otherwise fish eat fish. Apparently in a pond they have more hiding places.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
73
Reaction score
53
Location
Louisiana, near new orleans
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
Formulas are good, but then why go to this forum, because observations from others can sometimes give a better, long term picture. But I appreciate anyone who is willing to take their time posting to my newbie questions. :)
 

Meyer Jordan

Tadpole
Joined
Oct 10, 2014
Messages
7,177
Reaction score
5,665
Location
Pensacola, Florida
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
Formulas are good, but then why go to this forum, because observations from others can sometimes give a better, long term picture. But I appreciate anyone who is willing to take their time posting to my newbie questions. :)

Personal observations are just that......observations of what is usually of only their pond. Since no two (2) ponds are identical, the factors and processes that created the observed phenomena may be completely different in each pond. To know what will work requires knowing how it works.
In the case of "how many fish", the only 100% correct method of answering this question is fish load (total weight)/flowrate/total SSA. Anything else is pure conjecture.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 5, 2017
Messages
73
Reaction score
53
Location
Louisiana, near new orleans
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
I don't disagree with your analogy, its loigcal, and an excellent all around approach. However listening to what others actually experience has its place. Factors can change over time and conditions. Science is observation. Personal experience can help too. Thanks
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top