Watering for plants around pond


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Hi all, once again I have a newbie question.. not really a pond question but more for all the new plants I've just planted around the pond in the last month or so. We are in a hot, dry spell. Mu pond is very shaded (under two huge trees) my question is (given no rain) how often should I be watering my plants. I also have a smaller garden at the front of my house that receives quite a bit of sun. Same question for that one. So far I've watered about every second day. Not really getting any flowers in shaded area and the plants that were flowering when planted have all had the flowers go away but the plants still are good and green for the most part. Any words of wisdom would be appreciated
 
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That's dependent on so many factors - for example, the type of plants, the type of soil, how hot, how dry, how much rainfall... Lots of variables.

Here's a basic rundown - newly planted perennials need frequent (daily or every other day in the heat) watering so they can get established. As they mature you may find you water them less or not at all. Annuals of all types need to be kept watered based on the conditions - you will know they need water if they start to wilt. When it's hot and we haven't had rain I sometimes water annuals twice a day. A little wilting won't hurt them - too much wilting and you'll lose them. Shaded areas will retain moisture better than sunny.

Most plants go through a flowering cycle. Annuals will flower all season (some need to be deadheaded to encourage more buds). Some perennials will flower once and then be done; others will continue to flower for weeks.

Hope that helps! If your plants are looking healthy and green you're doing the right thing!
 
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Thank you for that.. I know there's so many factors.. I guess including how well drained the soil is too.. I know the mulch I have in the front gardens helps to retain moisture too so I usually leave those ones a bit longer between waterings but I have some new shrubs and things there so I've been watering a bit more often than usual even with the mulch.. One other thing, you mentioned about how some annuals need the dead flowers picked off, is that true of the perennials as well or do I have to look that up somewhere on a case by case basis? anyway, thanks again for the advice. I knew I could count on this forum!
 
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You may want to check with a local garden center for watering recommendations on new shrubs.

When we plant new shrubs we install drip irrigation and water them deeply at least once per week, again depending on the weather conditions. Things like shrubs and trees you want to encourage deep rooting, so you water them less frequently but for longer periods of time so the water goes deep into the soil. And year two is just as important as year one for shrubs, bushes and trees.
 
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...and save your filter rinse water to water your plants, it makes them happy.:) (Dirty pond water from partial water changes if ya ever have it too.)
 
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You may want to check with a local garden center for watering recommendations on new shrubs.

When we plant new shrubs we install drip irrigation and water them deeply at least once per week, again depending on the weather conditions. Things like shrubs and trees you want to encourage deep rooting, so you water them less frequently but for longer periods of time so the water goes deep into the soil. And year two is just as important as year one for shrubs, bushes and trees.
Oops .. I guess I'm watering the shrubs too much.. I did know that too, about encouraging deep rooting.. from a grass stand point anyway.. totally didn't think of it though thanks for the memory jog.
 
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Yup - if you water often and for short periods, you encourage the roots to stay near the surface. Then they will suffer as they mature and aren't able to access the moisture deeper in the ground.
 
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...and save your filter rinse water to water your plants, it makes them happy.:) (Dirty pond water from partial water changes if ya ever have it too.)
Thanks, I actually do that. I installed a faucet in my garbage can "filter" that draws water from the bottom where any excess sediment would be and I use that to fill a watering can from.. (planning to get another house for it instead). I don't use it every time but fairly regularly
 
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Yup - if you water often and for short periods, you encourage the roots to stay near the surface. Then they will suffer as they mature and aren't able to access the moisture deeper in the ground.
So I've always wondered, how long do you think constitutes a good deep soaking? Given normal sail.. like not as packed as a lawn but not all fresh planting soil... (Except right in the hole where new plants and shrubs are... I added fresh soil in there.
 
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I always test it - dig down and see how deep the water is soaking. I generally will run a hose at a trickle or use soaker hose for 45 min to an hour.
 
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Omg really!! Wow no wonder I kill everything.. I stand there sprinkling each plant in the garden for about 45 seconds to a minute! If I just use the open end of a hose with a steady flow of water placed right at the base of the plant how long would you guess (I know you don't know all the variables of my situation but a wild guess) maybe 10 mins on each plant? Any more than that in the front gardens and I think I'd flood my basement
 
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If you're talking perennial plants, I aim for a couple of gallons every time I water per plant. Measure the flow from your hose and you'll get a better idea how long that would take. I find when I water the best approach (in a bed of plants for example) is to pass over everything once to get the ground wet and then come back and water each plant a good amount. The ground absorbs water better when it's wet than it does when it's dry. I'll use my sprinkler on some of my beds too and just let it run for an hour or so - kind of simulates a nice rain that way. Also gives me an excuse to set a timer and sit in the shade!

For shrubs, trees or bushes, I'll let the hose run on trickle for an hour or more.
 
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That's a great help thank you. We're supposed to get thunderstorms today so I will hold off on trying out for today unless, of course, the weather man was wrong.... Again...lol
 
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The best thing I ever did was to get myself an inexpensive rain gauge. It's easy to lose track of when it rained and how much. I check my gauge after every rainfall and keep a mental note. It also tells me precisely how much water MY garden got, as opposed to general rainfall in my area, which can definitely vary.
 
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Ya, I can stand in the garden around the edge of my pond in a downpour and barely get a drop on me. Lol (did I mention my pond is in a tree cave) a rain gauge? Is that basically a graduated cylinder? That's a good idea too!
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You're right - you have both the advantage an disadvantage of a shady yard!

And yes - mine is a super cheap plastic one that you just stick in the ground with quarter inch increments marked not the side.
 
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I'll tell you the shade has been more a blessing so far this summer... We are having quite a hot spell..it doesn't look like we're getting our thunderstorms..: $@"%}%^weatherman... Lol. So I'm watering right now.: (one half turn of the faucet) 5 min at the base of each plant so over all I guess the garden will get about 45 min
 
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I'll tell you the shade has been more a blessing so far this summer... We are having quite a hot spell..it doesn't look like we're getting our thunderstorms..: $@"%}%^weatherman... Lol. So I'm watering right now.: (one half turn of the faucet) 5 min at the base of each plant so over all I guess the garden will get about 45 min
Yes I've lost it!!.... I'm now replying to myself... I'm still watering 2 hrs and 15 min later... I hope the little plants enjoy it....!!!! Cause it's the last time their gonna see a hose this year.... Lol
 
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haha! My three new soaker hoses just arrived at my door! Makes life so much easier!
 

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